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Editorials

  • EDITORIAL: Lawmakers should find important work to do

    Many people are familiar with the concept that if you do something right the first time, you reduce the potential that you’ll have to do it again.

    Indiana’s General Assembly needs to learn that concept.

  • EDITORIAL: Silly legislation helps no one

    Lately we’ve been hearing a lot from Indiana Republican lawmakers about how disappointed they are in Democrats for not showing up to make decisions in the first session. We could not agree more with them. We realize there are a lot of opinions running amuck at the moment due to hot-button issues on the table, most notably the right-to-work legislation.

    No matter what your opinion on the matter, everyone must agree that Republicans and Democrats not agreeing to hear one another out and work to compromise gets nothing done and we all suffer.

  • EDITORIAL: Daniels’ 2012 reform goals look practical overall

    Whether Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels is one of the nation’s best politicians is certainly debatable, but in setting his goals for this year’s legislative session he has shown that he is more practical than many politicians.

    In recent years the Tea Party movement has produced numerous elected officials – of the same political party as Daniels – who refuse to compromise on taxes, social issues or virtually anything. Therefore they have been able to enact very little of their political agenda.

  • EDITORIAL: Meeting challenges, reaching goals in 2012

    There’s plenty to be optimistic about as 2012 begins. While many of us will chart New Year’s resolutions to lose weight, quit smoking or spend more time with family, we would like to outline a few broader community goals.

    We hope the year ahead brings stability to Cannelton City Schools. Specifically, we would like leaders of the school district, threatened by a small student population and cuts in funding, to do one of two things in 2012:

  • EDITORIAL: Council, others should adopt clear expectations

    Rules are wonderful to have in many situations. They define expectations. When expectations are clear and agreed upon, things go more smoothly than if they aren’t.

    Councilman Ron Crawford expected to have a chance to nominate a new member to the county’s redevelopment commission when appointments were made Dec. 15. He asserted that Robert’s Rules of Order require a call for “any other nominations” before voting occurs on any that have been put forth.

  • EDITORIAL: Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus

    Editor’s Note: In the months before the Christmas of 1897, an 8-year-old girl named Virginia O’Hanlon wrote a letter to the New York Sun, asking if there really was a Santa Claus. Edward P. Mitchell gave the assignment to Francis P. Church, whose reply to Virginia appeared in the Sept. 21, 1897, edition of the Sun. Virginia’s letter and Church’s reply, as it appeared in the Sun, are reprinted below. Virginia O’Hanlon Douglas died May 13, 1971.

    Is there a Santa Claus?

  • EDITORIAL: Letting people raise their own taxes could be good move

    Despite the fact that American people are increasingly worried about the national debt and budget deficits and despite the fact that many important parts of federal and state government’s budgets – including education – have been cut to the bone, most politicians are still unwilling to raise taxes – even on our wealthiest citizens.

  • EDITORIAL: Teen right to defend opinion, even if politician, school disagree

    A Kansas high-school senior recently caused quite a commotion when a tweet she made as a joke with her friends caught national attention.

    Emma Sullivan, an 18-year-old student of Shawnee Mission East High School in Fairway, Kan., traveled with a Youth in Government program to see Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback speak. After hearing his speech, Sullivan decided she didn’t support his thoughts and took to social-media site, Twitter, to voice her disapproval.

  • EDITORIAL: Police canines pull their weight

    The News does an admirable job of reporting on the successes – and the occasional failure – of police officers, but we can’t remember the last time we singled out the work of police dogs.

    There are three of them at work in Perry County. Trooper Mark Lehmkuhler’s German shepherd Brote, Tell City Patrolman Derrick Lawalin’s German shepherd Jago and Cannelton Police Department Sgt. Lee Hall’s Eric.

  • EDITORIAL: Neighborhood Watch goals admirable; volunteers should focus on neighborhoods

    A new Neighborhood Watch program is under way in Tell City, offering extra sets of eyes and ears in the fight against criminal activity.

    We support the program’s goals of providing information to police officers about possible vandalism, gang activity and other wrongdoing. We also acknowledge volunteers’ stated efforts to promote disaster preparedness and education on crime prevention.