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Editorials

  • EDITORIAL: Old junior high school should be sold as soon as possible

    The Tell City-Troy Township School Board hopes to hear options this month on how to dispose of the vacant former junior high school, and we hope this will lead to its quickly changing hands.

    Options presented at last month’s school board meeting included listing the building with local real-estate companies or conducting an auction. We vote for the latter, as it will likely lead to quicker disposal of the building.

  • EDITORIAL: Politics is about morals, too

    While many Republicans focused on defeating President Barack Obama in November hope their party’s raucous nominating process wraps up soon, others of us – of all party affiliations – are enjoying the spirited competition between the three main GOP contenders, Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum and Newt Gingrich.

  • EDITORIAL: Seventh Street’s future may be getting brighter

    Tell City’s Seventh Street will be in the spotlight at City Hall tonight as a special meeting introduces a proposal to build an event and visitors center.

    The project is nowhere near finalized but income from the sale of homes constructed under Tell City’s Neighborhood Stabilization Program grant would be used to help pay for the structure.

  • EDITORIAL: Try ordinances before condemning them to failure

    “Let’s try something, even if it’s wrong.”

    That apparent misguidance may have merit in two current situations in Perry County.

    In one, county-council members are attempting to undo a long process the county commissioners finished up in December. In the other, the mayor of Cannelton is suggesting an ordinance protecting renters be rescinded.

    Before the county commissioners did their part, others worked hard as members of a committee examining the county’s need for an animal-control ordinance.

  • EDITORIAL: Crackdown on license plates unnecessary

    As the Indiana 2012 legislative session starts to wrap up, our elected officials are putting final touches on bills that have passed and probably making plans for the next session; all things that you would expect them to be doing.

    There is something that is going on, however, that is raising a few eyebrows.

    Last week, it seemed the GOP decided they wanted to revive the topic of specialty groups’ license plates, an issue that died already in the legislative session this year. So what exactly is the issue?

  • EDITORIAL: Snowe’s retirement should be wakeup call for Tea Party

    Sen. Olympia Snowe, R-Maine, surprised most political observers when she announced Tuesday that she will not seek re-election this year.

    According to USA Today, she said “she could not face another unproductive six-year term with the polarization and partisanship that has overtaken Washington – and the Senate in particular.”

    The Tea Party wing of Republicans is trying to purge the GOP of moderates such as Snowe, but Snowe’s retirement announcement should be a wakeup call that their strategy is likely to backfire.

  • EDITORIAL: Planning and zoning shouldn’t be a second-rate county service

    The lead headline in Thursday’s News proclaimed Perry County’s planning and zoning department to be in crisis. That wasn’t journalistic exaggeration. The resignation of Planning and Zoning Director Jim Gogel and the lack of funding that reduced the only employee to part-time status doesn’t bode well. It also doesn’t sit well with us because we believe planning and zoning should be a focus of county government, not an afterthought.

  • EDITORIAL: Who gets to strip our unalienable rights?

    We wish to propose a new way to think about expression by students.

    We suggest that the ideas contained in the Declaration of Independence, “that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these (is) liberty …” be understood to mean we are born with the freedoms we enjoy, and no one can take them away.

  • EDITORIAL: Soldiers deserve a hero’s welcome home

    A letter to the editor in a recent edition of the Evansville Courier and Press addressed an interesting topic.

    As efforts to bring more and more of America’s troops home from the Middle East continue, many veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, elected officials, public figures and citizens alike believe it’s appropriate to honor soldiers with a parade down the famous “Canyon of Heroes” in New York City.

  • EDITORIAL: Partial smoking ban better than none

    Politicians today are often criticized for their unwillingness to compromise, but in many cases it seems they are merely following the examples of their constituents.

    Last year when the Indiana Senate considered a ban on smoking in many public places, several health advocates — including the American Cancer Society — complained that the bill was too weak. Thus the Senate Public Policy Committee decided to vote the bill down and instead of a ban on smoking in some public places, it was banned in none.