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Editorials

  • EDITORIAL: Efforts to identify sewer problems can pay off

    We commend Tell City Mayor Barbara Ewing and others for efforts, now in their infancy, launched to prevent another sewer-line failure such as the one that caused a street to collapse under the weight of a utility truck.

    As the News reported one week ago, a contractor inserted a fiberglass “sock” into the line, then expanded and heated it to form a solid liner through which wastewater would flow.

  • Ryan knows spending has to be reined in

    Like him or not, the choice of Congressman Paul Ryan as Mitt Romney’s running mate will sharpen the presidential debate about the role of government and the need to control runaway federal spending.

    As a congressman and head of the House of Representatives Budget Committee, Ryan knows our nation cannot continue digging itself and its future generations into more debt. Tough decisions lie ahead and Ryan as a vice presidential candidate will sharpen the fiscal differences between President Obama and Romney.

  • EDITORIAL: Joining together to make a more beautiful Tell City

    Friday morning, the Tell City Comprehensive Plan Committee organized a cleanup of the downtown area of the city from Guttenberg to Tell streets. With Schweizer Fest approaching fast, committee members asked residents and businesses to come together to “spruce up” before the tents go up in City Hall Park for the yearly summer fest.

  • EDITORIAL: USOC should have required uniforms to be made in U.S.

    “You’d think they’d know better,” said U.S. Speaker of the House John Boehner when it was revealed that Ralph Lauren had the uniforms U.S. athletes will wear at the Olympic Games opening ceremonies made in China.

    Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid was less restrained. “I think the (U.S.) Olympic Committee should be ashamed of themselves,” he said. “I think they should take all the uniforms, put them in a big pile and burn them.”

  • EDITORIAL: Our state’s $2.15 billion surplus – good and bad

    The fiscal year for our state ended June 30 and as it came to a close, state auditor Tim Berry reported a surplus of $2.15 billion in Indiana’s coffers; a hefty amount considering the current situation of the economy.

    Naturally, there are different ways to look at the news of the surplus. You can take it as our state government doing what most haven’t in the down economy – they lived within their means, tightened belts when needed and sacrificed a lot to keep the numbers in the black. Basically, our elected officials did their jobs.

  • EDITORIAL: Those who ignore child abuse should face jail time

    The conviction in Philadelphia of a Roman Catholic priest accused of failing to report cases of sex crimes against children should serve as a wake-up call to others who intentionally turn a blind eye toward abuse.

    In a trial that garnered far less attention than that of former Penn State football coach Jerry Sandusky, Msgr. William J. Lynn was convicted of child endangerment. A former aid to the late Cardinal Anthony Bevilacqua, Lynn is the first senior U.S. church official convicted of covering up sexual abuse by priests.

  • EDITORIAL: Monofill needed, but will it be inflicted on neighbors or quietly inserted?

    A monofill, defined as a landfill serving only one industry, may be inflicted upon or quietly inserted into a farming area in the center of the county.

  • EDITORIAL: Nonpartisan blanket primary would likely increase voter turnout

    In Indiana’s primary election this year some Democrats wanted to vote for Richard Lugar in the Republican senate race but wanted to vote for their favorite Democratic candidates in other races.

    Under Indiana election law, they could not do both, though. They had to choose a ballot with only Republican candidates or one with only Democratic candidates.

    But under a California election law adopted by voters as Proposition 14 in 2010, voters could do both.

  • EDITORIAL: Cannelton superintendent, school board, it’s your burden to share the truth with us

    Supporters of Cannelton City Schools may have felt under fire in recent months – perhaps as long as the last few years. The list of challenges facing the small city school district is neither small nor filled with secrets. Limited enrollment, changes in the way the state provides its funding and rising expenses have crippled the school district’s finances to the point where debt has accumulated and bills, at times at least, have gone unpaid and educational staff reduced.

  • EDITORIAL: NYPD violates constitutional guarantees

    The New York City Police Department’s surveillance of Muslims is as outrageous as would be a similar scrutiny of Catholics or members of any other faith.

    New York Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks proved New Yorkers could not rely solely on the federal government for protection, according to an Associated Press story published Wednesday in the Evansville Courier & Press.