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Editorials

  • EDITORIAL: Indiana Education Board seems more concerned about politics than education

    There’s been a lot of news lately about the state’s education board and past state schools chief Tony Bennett. We’ve addressed some of these issues in this section before and we imagine other Hoosiers are as frustrated as we are. It’s come to the point where it appears the state education board, department and state politicians are more concerned about political strategy than the education of our children.

  • EDITORIAL: Attack justification must be irrefutable

    Should America attack Syria?

    The House and Senate could vote as early as today on that question, according to a report Thursday by Democracy Now. The news program included footage of Florida Rep. Alan Grayson questioning Secretary of State John Kerry, who with President Obama is leading efforts to garner support for an attack.

    “Have members of the Syrian opposition called for such an attack?” Grayson asked, “and if so, whom?”

  • EDITORIAL: Governor should respect Ritz and her authority

    Gov. Mike Pence’s announcement last week that he will form a Center for Education and Career Innovation may be a good step in promoting lifelong learning and reducing the state’s unemployment rate. The decision, however, should have included Superintendent of Public Instruction Glenda Ritz and her staff in the process.

    He didn’t and that’s a problem in our eyes.

  • EDITORIAL: Perry County has rich history worth celebrating in bicentennial

    Next year will mark Perry County’s bicentennial and a group organized by Perry County Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Cheri Taylor is meeting the second Tuesday of each month to plan a celebration for it.

    The meetings are open to anyone and we urge any interested citizen to attend. We think the celebration is a good idea, as Perry County has a rich history worth celebrating that most people may not be aware of.

  • EDITORIAL: Late-summer thumbs-up

    The conclusion of a successful Schweizer Fest – Tell City’s 55th – prompts us to extend a big thumbs-up to everyone who helped with the effort. That’s a large group, far too numerous for us to try to list individually or even by subgroups. It nearly takes a community to pull off a community festival and Tell City does it every year. Congratulations, everyone.

    We also offer the following thumbs-up kudos.

  • EDITORIAL: Entrepreneurship alive and well in southern Indiana

    The Evansville Courier & Press published a nice tribute a few weeks ago to the late Phil Koch and the spirit of community and business involvement for which he was known. The recounting of all the things the Koch family has done for our area brought back plenty of good memories for many.

    We still miss the entrepreneurism and optimism of Will Koch, Phil’s late brother. Both men, as have their siblings, followed in the visionary footsteps of their father, Bill Koch, in promoting community involvement in southern Indiana and building successful businesses.

  • EDITORIAL: Grab your Schweizer running (or walking) shoes

    Schweizer Fest has always been a celebration of Tell City, its rich past, its exciting present and the promise of an even brighter future. This  week, we invite everyone to make fitness a meaningful part of their festivities. There are more opportunities than ever to include a good workout – or at least some exercise – into the merriment of the week.

  • EDITORIAL: Media should be cautious when spreading information

    As reporters, it is our job to share the truth with our community. We strive hard to find all the facts, to talk to as many people as we can to make sure what we print provides our readers accurate information.

  • EDITORIAL: Republican legislators right to resist Pence’s tax cut

    Our system of government is based on checks and balances, several of which were written into the U.S. Constitution.

    One check that was not written into the Constitution was the two-party system. As long as one party does not dominate any government, it is hard to pass foolish legislation, as two sides get to make their points in extensive debate first.

  • EDITORIAL: Benedict’s resignation changes papacy forever

    Pope Benedict XVI’s decision to resign the papacy has forever changed the way the world views the man who holds the keys of St. Peter. That may not be a bad thing since the man who will replace Benedict faces real-world issues that demand quick and decisive action.

    Berlin Archbishop Rainer Woelki was on the mark when he called Benedict’s decision to step down, the first pope to do so in six centuries, “a demystification of the papal office.”