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Editorials

  • Guest editorial: Indiana dumps a problem on sheriffs

    House Bill 1006, which passed in 2015, was supposed to reduce prison crowding in Indiana by sending more low-level felons back to the counties where they were convicted.

    The idea was that the prisoners would be closer to their families, reducing the risk of recidivism after they finish their sentences.

    But it turns out that what the state was doing was creating enormous headaches for counties. While state prison beds were emptying, county jails were being filled beyond capacity and county budgets were being severely challenged.

  • Trump’s $54 billion increase in military spending unwarranted

    President Donald Trump presented a budget outline last week that included a $54 billion increase in defense spending and an equivalent decrease in non-defense, discretionary spending. We think our nation would be better served by a budget doing the opposite in each of those areas.

    Trump said the nearly 10 percent increase in the military budget is needed “to rebuild the depleted military of the United States of America at a time we most need it.”

    But our “depleted military” is a myth.

  • Push for redistricting reform

    We should’ve known it would be too much to ask.

    How could a legislative committee chair balk at an opportunity to do the right thing by establishing an independent commission to create state and congressional maps, ultimately removing politics from the redistricting process?

    It’s easy when the political party in charge — Republican or Democrat — is intent on holding onto its power.

  • Citizens Police Academy can do good work

    Thursday’s story about a soon-to-form Citizens Police Academy is welcome news. We hope the program helps to better share the good work of local law enforcement and will help to advance the already-strong relationships between the community and local law enforcement.

    Too often it’s the rare mistake by an officer that makes the news and causes us to overlook police departments’ record of good work in enforcing laws and keeping our streets safe, while respecting the rights of citizens.

  • ‘Sell by’ dates on food could soon see needed change

    How much food gets tossed into waste baskets at home? Is it spoiled or do you just think it is?

    The two largest trade groups in the grocery industry, the Food Marketing Institute and the Grocery Manufacturers Association, have announced new standards of labeling grocery products. The decision could eliminate some of the confusion surrounding “sell by” or “best by” dates.

  • Staying informed is easier than you think

    Subscribing to a local news source like the Perry County News is still one of the best ways to stay in touch with what’s happening in the community. Now, more than ever, it’s important for Perry Countians to know what is going on.

    We were surprised to hear Tell City residents say last week they had no knowledge of recent water and sewage rate increases. The News offered extensive coverage on the topic over the last several months, and even included charts of prospective fee hikes. There were also  legal postings printed in the paper.

  • Indiana history should be offered in high schools

    One bill introduced in the current session of the Indiana General Assembly would require all Indiana public and charter high schools to offer a semester-long elective course on Indiana history.

    The bill passed the Senate 47-3 and is now before the House.

    We think the House should also pass the bill and the governor should sign it. We would be inclined to make it a required course, but having it available to every student as an elective would be a good start.

  • Flamboyant Trump can overcome turbulence

    The shift of power from one president to the next has rarely, if ever, been as contemptuous as it is now. It is, however, too early to blanketly cast off the Trump era; as like all presidents who have come before, what happens while in office will bear the hindsight of his accomplishments. It may be difficult, but a little optimism would go a long way.

  • Who cares if Kushner serves as Trump adviser?

    President-elect Donald Trump’s many critics can certainly find several things to complain about regarding people he has chosen to fill roles in his administration.

    But we think they would be best served by remembering the old rule about picking one’s battles and not worry about fighting the appointment of Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, as a special adviser based on the federal anti-nepotism law.

  • Holcomb’s initial ideas would move the state in right direction

    This editorial first appeared in the (Bloomington) Herald-Times.

     

    Eric Holcomb became Indiana’s 51st governor in an inauguration ceremony Monday. The Republican is long on political experience as a former state party chairman but short on experience with governing as an elected official. Hoosiers will be well served if his skills with people and diplomacy overrule the instincts built over time to put his political party first.