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Editorials

  • Derby residents get things done and do them right

    We are happy to see Perry County communities thrive and grow, and that’s certainly been the case recently with Derby. Located on the Ohio River and able to trace its history back for more than 150 years, the small town is bustling with new projects and committed civic involvement.

  • Super delegates complicate nomination process

    It’s about time the Democratic party extinguishes the unjust firestorm it started when it implemented super delegates into the primary election system. Designed to infuse more voter performance in the voting system, it has worked to ignite more controversy.

    Coming off a disastrous loss against Ronald Reagan in the 1980 election, a committee within the Democratic National Convention implemented new rules so party elites would have a better chance at choosing a worthwhile candidate. Reagan had decimated incumbent Jimmy Carter and the DNC did not take it lightly. 

  • Indiana police body camera bill finally on right path

    State legislation to determine rules for public access to video footage from police body cameras and police dashboard cameras in Indiana is finally on the right path. But there’s still work to do before House Bill 1019 would be an effective law.

    The version of the bill that had passed the House of Representatives was fundamentally flawed. Basically, it demanded that members of the public justify their need to see police video footage.

  • Amphitheatre offers bargains for everyone’s musical tastes

    For many years the Indianapolis Motor Speedway hosted only the Indianapolis 500. Then the track’s owners realized it did not make financial sense to use it only once a year, so now it also hosts a NASCAR race and Formula 1 race each year.

    Now the Lincoln Amphitheatre is using similar thinking to expand its offerings.

  • Easing the TIF battle

    Recent concerns expressed by the Tell City-Troy Township School Board about tax-increment financing bear some merit, as late in the game as it may be. It’s  a complicated issue but there are paths to common ground if both parties work together.

  • City needs to act now on Obrecht House

    “It’s hard for us to point fingers at any one person whose property is in need of repair, but the sorry state of the Obrecht House on Tell City’s Seventh Street is one that warrants community concern and this editorial.”

  • Hemp may have bright future on Indiana farms

    On Jan. 11, District 74 State Rep. Lloyd Arnold authored House Bill 1228, which “allows the state seed commissioner to implement laws concerning industrial hemp.”

    This could be a big step forward for Indiana, putting it in the same territory as Kentucky with regard to industrial and agricultural hemp legalization. Hemp is the cousin of the marijuana plant, though genetically different and containing only trace amounts of the psychoactive substance, THC.

  • Watered-down bill will not alleviate meth crisis

    With no opposition, a measure that is supposed to undermine methamphetamine cooks passed the Indiana House of Representatives’ Public Health Committee Wednesday.

    But because of earlier opposition by outside interests, the bill has been so watered down that it’s likely eventual passing by the full General Assembly will do little or nothing to combat our state’s serious methamphetamine problem.

  • Facade program will be good for Tell City

    Considering a winter storm had passed through earlier in the week, we were glad to see a good number of people present at Wednesday evening’s meeting on Tell City’s new facade-improvement program.

    Sponsored by Brick by Brick on Main, the name for what was formerly the Tell City Development and Action Committee, the facade program will provide matching money for businesses owners who want to improve the appearance of their facades, or front areas, of their buildings.

  • Teachers deserve more respect

    Recently released Indiana Statewide Testing For Educational Progress scores saw the dire predictions of many educators come to pass. The 2015 test, plagued by technical issues, more rigid standards and a truncated timetable for preparation saw just more than half of Hoosier students pass this year’s test, down from 74 percent last year.