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Editorials

  • Texting while driving ban a smart step

    Distracted driving encompasses many things, from one’s drinking morning coffee to reading the newspaper, but research and tragic experiences show that using cell phones while driving is a preventa-ble distraction that outweighs all others. Most common sense should dictate good driving habits, but the 100-year history of the automobile has shown that not to be the case. It’s only human nature to fidget with the radio, primp in the mirror or talk with a rider. Twenty-first-century technology has only added to the list of things that divert our attention while on the road.

  • Library merger committee on right track

    Earlier this month, Tell City-Perry County Library Board members heard about continuing efforts of a committee to see if a merger of the two county libraries in Tell City and Cannelton would be possible and beneficial. It’s been a few months since the two libraries decided to pursue this challenge and it seems committee members are starting to get into the different aspects of the merger that will determine if the two libraries will be able to become one.

  • START ratification proves bipartisanship still alive

    Whether it was after Democrats’ winning heavily in 2008 or Republicans’ winning heavily this year, recent U.S. congressional elections have been followed by requests from media members, including this newspaper, for both sides to work together better and seek more bipartisan solutions to our country’s challenges.
    So far the politicians haven’t listened often enough to those requests. But will they heed such requests better when they come from one of their own and from someone they hired?

  • Working together, we can defeat breast cancer

    October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. During this time, groups and organizations will raise funds to combat this disease, but the month is about more than just fundraising and pink ribbons. It’s about remembering those lost and honoring those who have fought and won the battle. And it’s about helping women understand the risks of this horrible and painful cancer.

  • Women work at least as hard as men; pay them accordingly

    We’re a nation that considers ourself among the greatest on the planet. So why do we have such a problem treating ourselves properly?

    We pretend to hold women in high esteem, yet when payday rolls around, we shortchange them by double-digit percentages.

  • It’s time to ban herbal products abused as pot

    Herbal products that have become a dangerous but legal substitute for marijuana need to be banned. Spencer County commissioners did that last week and at least one state legislator is looking to do the same statewide. We support them and encourage county leaders here to consider a similar ban – soon.
     

    “K2” is a brand name for a legal product consisting of a blend of dried herbs that has been sprayed with a chemical and that when smoked, produces a euphoria similar to that of marijuana.   

  • Government should not require FM radios on cell phones

    Many conservatives think there should be virtually no regulation of commerce: Businesses should be allowed to offer whatever products they think they can sell and let the buyer beware.

    Many liberals think government should strictly regulate every feature of every product manufactured or sold in the United States.

    We think there has to be a happy medium between the two sides.

  • It’s time for eyesores to go

    Tell City is getting tough on its worst eyesores. Heaven, be praised.

    Suits have been filed against Carolyn Barr’s Rebarr Restoration LLC, owner of the former William Tell Hotel, and Tellco Properties, which owns the heap of rubble at the corner of Seventh and Franklin streets, and an intact building attached to it.

    As most everyone who spends even occasional time in Tell City knows, a large section of wall collapsed at the William Tell Hotel in late July.

  • State library should keep local decisions in local hands

    When we were younger, most if not all of our parents told us to play nice and share. As we grew older, we would hear about striving to be good neighbors and community members.