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Editorials

  • The U.S. Supreme Court at least works

    After the untimely death of Associate Justice Antonin Scalia Feb. 13, the Supreme Court was thrown into disarray as the number of justices fell from its normal, odd-numbered complement of nine jurists to the problematic, even-numbered current array of eight.

  • Classified forest tax breaks shouldn’t last forever

    We feel a sense of accomplishment when news stories generate comments and letters to the editor. That was the case after a front-page story earlier this year on an increase in the base valuation for classified forests.

    In case you missed the story, the state legislature passed and Gov. Mike Pence signed a bill increasing the assessed valuation of land in the classified forest program from $1 per acre to $13.29.

    Perry County is home to more than 59,000 acres of classified forest so the change affects a lot of people.

  • Infrastructure always a sound investment

    Indiana’s state legislature should be commended for finding common ground and passing a bill aimed at improving road infrastructure.

    In an era of political obstruction among our national lawmakers, it is a refreshing change of pace to see our state’s legislative body make a bipartisan productive move.

    Gov. Mike Pence said, in a press conference about House Bill 1001, that the funds allotted by the legislation would be used to equally fund state and local thoroughfares.

  • Know where your food comes from

    Thank goodness for local efforts to provide fresh commodities through the farmer’s markets. Spring is upon us and that means supplies of garden goods will soon be available to consumers.

    We see many benefits to shopping with local producers, be it health, economic or environmental or simply a way to hold onto family traditions. Not to mention, today’s on-the-go lifestyles are making the once-routine, home from-scratch cooking almost a lost art. Too often, families are bypassing the kitchen table in favor of restaurants, or, sadly, a paper sack and the car seat.

  • Derby residents get things done and do them right

    We are happy to see Perry County communities thrive and grow, and that’s certainly been the case recently with Derby. Located on the Ohio River and able to trace its history back for more than 150 years, the small town is bustling with new projects and committed civic involvement.

  • Super delegates complicate nomination process

    It’s about time the Democratic party extinguishes the unjust firestorm it started when it implemented super delegates into the primary election system. Designed to infuse more voter performance in the voting system, it has worked to ignite more controversy.

    Coming off a disastrous loss against Ronald Reagan in the 1980 election, a committee within the Democratic National Convention implemented new rules so party elites would have a better chance at choosing a worthwhile candidate. Reagan had decimated incumbent Jimmy Carter and the DNC did not take it lightly. 

  • Indiana police body camera bill finally on right path

    State legislation to determine rules for public access to video footage from police body cameras and police dashboard cameras in Indiana is finally on the right path. But there’s still work to do before House Bill 1019 would be an effective law.

    The version of the bill that had passed the House of Representatives was fundamentally flawed. Basically, it demanded that members of the public justify their need to see police video footage.

  • Amphitheatre offers bargains for everyone’s musical tastes

    For many years the Indianapolis Motor Speedway hosted only the Indianapolis 500. Then the track’s owners realized it did not make financial sense to use it only once a year, so now it also hosts a NASCAR race and Formula 1 race each year.

    Now the Lincoln Amphitheatre is using similar thinking to expand its offerings.

  • Easing the TIF battle

    Recent concerns expressed by the Tell City-Troy Township School Board about tax-increment financing bear some merit, as late in the game as it may be. It’s  a complicated issue but there are paths to common ground if both parties work together.

  • City needs to act now on Obrecht House

    “It’s hard for us to point fingers at any one person whose property is in need of repair, but the sorry state of the Obrecht House on Tell City’s Seventh Street is one that warrants community concern and this editorial.”