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Editorials

  • VA should fix problems, not distract from them

    When it comes to healthcare, no one should have to wait. That sentiment should especially extend to our veterans, the men and women who give up much and ask for so little in return.

    National Veteran’s Affairs Secretary Bob McDonald recently came under fire for downplaying the amount of time veterans have been awaiting medical treatment at VA facilities, according to a May 23 article in USA Today.

  • Ellspermann good choice to lead Ivy Tech

    Former Indiana Lt. Gov. Sue Ellspermann’s appointment Wednesday as president of Ivy Tech’s community college system should be good for Ivy Tech and its Tell City campus but may not be good for Gov. Mike Pence’s re-election chances.

    Ivy Tech has struggled in recent years – there was even a rumor the Tell City campus might close. Luckily, local efforts kept the center open.

  • Make animal control a focus of next year’s budget

    If you believe the complaints coming from city council chambers or those transmitted via the dispatch center, the urban centers of Perry County may very well be going to the dogs. Not only the dogs, but cats, too.

  • Thank you, Perry County’s corrections officers

    National Correctional Officers Week has special meaning in Perry County. Hundreds of people are employed as either correctional officers or in related fields of corrections work. Many of them work at the Branchville Correctional Facility, which has long been a leading employer within our county.

    Other corrections workers are employed at the Perry County Detention Center.

    All of them deserve our thanks.

  • Child abuse prevention an endless effort

    Child abuse, because of its broad societal impacts, should be at the forefront of our awareness all year.

    Child abuse and neglect, which the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention calls “significant public health problems” in the United States, are being called to the spotlight during April, Child Abuse Awareness Month.

  • Despite potential flaws, red-light camera might be needed at city intersection

    That the use of red-light cameras can be abused has been well documented, especially in Chicago, which has more such cameras than any other city in the country.

    For that reason we have editorialized against the use of such cameras in the past. But if drivers don’t stop running red lights at one of Tell City’s busiest intersections, we will have to recommend that the city look into installing a camera there.

  • The U.S. Supreme Court at least works

    After the untimely death of Associate Justice Antonin Scalia Feb. 13, the Supreme Court was thrown into disarray as the number of justices fell from its normal, odd-numbered complement of nine jurists to the problematic, even-numbered current array of eight.

  • Classified forest tax breaks shouldn’t last forever

    We feel a sense of accomplishment when news stories generate comments and letters to the editor. That was the case after a front-page story earlier this year on an increase in the base valuation for classified forests.

    In case you missed the story, the state legislature passed and Gov. Mike Pence signed a bill increasing the assessed valuation of land in the classified forest program from $1 per acre to $13.29.

    Perry County is home to more than 59,000 acres of classified forest so the change affects a lot of people.

  • Infrastructure always a sound investment

    Indiana’s state legislature should be commended for finding common ground and passing a bill aimed at improving road infrastructure.

    In an era of political obstruction among our national lawmakers, it is a refreshing change of pace to see our state’s legislative body make a bipartisan productive move.

    Gov. Mike Pence said, in a press conference about House Bill 1001, that the funds allotted by the legislation would be used to equally fund state and local thoroughfares.

  • Know where your food comes from

    Thank goodness for local efforts to provide fresh commodities through the farmer’s markets. Spring is upon us and that means supplies of garden goods will soon be available to consumers.

    We see many benefits to shopping with local producers, be it health, economic or environmental or simply a way to hold onto family traditions. Not to mention, today’s on-the-go lifestyles are making the once-routine, home from-scratch cooking almost a lost art. Too often, families are bypassing the kitchen table in favor of restaurants, or, sadly, a paper sack and the car seat.