• EDITORIAL: Those who ignore child abuse should face jail time

    The conviction in Philadelphia of a Roman Catholic priest accused of failing to report cases of sex crimes against children should serve as a wake-up call to others who intentionally turn a blind eye toward abuse.

    In a trial that garnered far less attention than that of former Penn State football coach Jerry Sandusky, Msgr. William J. Lynn was convicted of child endangerment. A former aid to the late Cardinal Anthony Bevilacqua, Lynn is the first senior U.S. church official convicted of covering up sexual abuse by priests.

  • EDITORIAL: Monofill needed, but will it be inflicted on neighbors or quietly inserted?

    A monofill, defined as a landfill serving only one industry, may be inflicted upon or quietly inserted into a farming area in the center of the county.

  • EDITORIAL: Nonpartisan blanket primary would likely increase voter turnout

    In Indiana’s primary election this year some Democrats wanted to vote for Richard Lugar in the Republican senate race but wanted to vote for their favorite Democratic candidates in other races.

    Under Indiana election law, they could not do both, though. They had to choose a ballot with only Republican candidates or one with only Democratic candidates.

    But under a California election law adopted by voters as Proposition 14 in 2010, voters could do both.

  • EDITORIAL: Cannelton superintendent, school board, it’s your burden to share the truth with us

    Supporters of Cannelton City Schools may have felt under fire in recent months – perhaps as long as the last few years. The list of challenges facing the small city school district is neither small nor filled with secrets. Limited enrollment, changes in the way the state provides its funding and rising expenses have crippled the school district’s finances to the point where debt has accumulated and bills, at times at least, have gone unpaid and educational staff reduced.

  • EDITORIAL: NYPD violates constitutional guarantees

    The New York City Police Department’s surveillance of Muslims is as outrageous as would be a similar scrutiny of Catholics or members of any other faith.

    New York Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks proved New Yorkers could not rely solely on the federal government for protection, according to an Associated Press story published Wednesday in the Evansville Courier & Press.

  • EDITORIAL: Be mindful of bicyclists

    If you read the Evansville Courier & Press, you might have seen the recent report of the death of a cyclist on Green River Road. Such news brings the realization that with summer, rising gas prices and school being out of session, more of our neighbors, co-workers, family and friends will be out and about on bicycles. It also reminds us of the importance of sharing the road safely.

  • EDITORIAL: Opposing bipartisanship won’t get much accomplished

    Richard Lugar’s loss in the Republican primary this month means Indiana will have a new United States senator next January.

    One could argue that it was time for Lugar to go, as he has already served twice as long as any previous Hoosier senator and if re-elected he would have turned 86 before his next term ended.

  • EDITORIAL: We can’t afford to forget the purpose of Memorial Day

    Memorial Day is approaching and we hope Perry Countians will commit a portion of the long weekend to recalling the heroism of the men and women who gave their lives in service to our land.

    Unfortunately, Memorial Day risks being crowded out by so many other activities: graduations, vacations, even auto racing. We know the first summer holiday is a busy time for everyone, but we encourage individuals and families to honor fallen and living veterans.

  • EDITORIAL: Help county officials comply with disabilities act

    The underlying goal of the Americans with Disabilities Act was to ensure people whose ability to move about is limited would enjoy many of the liberties guaranteed to everyone else.

    It looked good on paper, and to a large degree that’s where it remained.

    A report issued in 2009 contained a foreword by Attorney General Janet Reno celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act. “The ADA is making the dream of access a reality,” she wrote.

  • EDITORIAL: Freedom to record a right for everyone

    “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.”

    The words of our First Amendment appear at the top of this page every week. As journalists, we take these words very seriously as they are – in part – what makes up our job.