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Editorials

  • Fewer waivers, a more open government

    That the last week brought news of ethics reform for Hoosier state government is nothing new.

    What was different was that the news was encouraging.

    According to state records, government officials have been issuing fewer waivers that would let state employees take related jobs in the private sector before a yearlong wait.

    So far this year, just one waiver has been granted. That’s in contrast to the past decade, where about 10 waivers were allowed each year.

  • County leaders: Search for savings before adopting tax

    We were glad to learn the county council plans to wait some time before taking action on a public-safety tax. If adopted, Perry County workers could see an additional one-quarter of 1 percent deducted from their paychecks. That may not sound like much but as many Perry Countians know, every dollar counts.

  • Editorial: Social insurance is a legacy worth preserving
  • Lessons learned in government squander

    Those who lead this nation and its offices are entrusted to spend our dollars wisely. So when officials feel hoodwinked, there is a duty to recoup lost revenues. But bad business decisions on their part, made on blind faith and a strong brand, should not be fodder for federal court – especially when the institution reaped the benefits, at least in the moment.

  • Goodell’s lying about Deflategate should exonerate Brady

    The National Football League’s image has taken a hit in the last 18 months due to what many perceived as its inadequate reaction to domestic- and child-abuse cases against some star players and to concussions suffered by current and former players.

  • Tell City’s big week is here; we have a lot to celebrate

    Schweizer Fest is here and we know it’s going to be a great week. As we write this on a Friday, we continue to hear rave reviews of the Schweizer Fest production of “Mary Poppins.” That show wrapped up Sunday afternoon.

    Thanks to everyone involved in its success.

    Schweizer Fest, as nearly everyone knows, marks the Swiss-German heritage of the city. It also recognizes the daring and determination of the first 1858 settlers who cleared – quite literally with their hands and pick axes – a future for themselves and following generations

  • Together, we can help students succeed

    With August on the horizon, Perry County students and educators are gearing up for another school year.

    Classes will begin Tuesday, Aug. 4, for Perry Central Community School and the Tell City-Troy Township School corps. Cannelton School District will welcome students for their first day of classes the following Tuesday, Aug. 11.

    As school administrators, faculty and staff prepare to open their classrooms, students and their families are also busy preparing for a new year of learning.

  • Our View: Troy Town Board: Don’t fall asleep at the wheel

    Just a few blocks from the rising Ohio River, Troy Town council members continue to paddle around their own turbulent waters. Meanwhile, residents and current and potential business interests are waiting, watching and taking note.

    The board – and town staff – have struggled through several challenges over the past year. In February, Bret Kleeman was appointed to replace John Mathena, who resigned in January.

  • Changing the high court would be overreacting

    People who usually revere the Founding Fathers and the U.S. Constitution today are voicing doubts about whether the founders got it right with respect to the Supreme Court.

    The critics’ misgivings come in the wake of two decisions they disliked – the court’s recent upholding of the federal health-care law and, more divisively, the ruling that same-sex marriage is legal in all 50 states.

  • Courts need more child advocates

    Children’s voices are innocuous, and  in a court system devised to deal with adult issues, they are sometimes overshadowed; their messages are not thoroughly recognized. That’s why earlier this month, judges from local communities rallied to ask for assistance in helping kids overcome the effects of abuse and neglect, through volunteerism in the court-appointed-special-advocates program.