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Editorials

  • City faces tough annexation decision

    The Indiana Court of Appeals ruled last week that annexation opponents obtained the required signatures to formally challenge Tell City’s plans to incorporate 1,776 acres. It may seem odd that an annexation ordinance passed nearly three years ago, in April 2014, is still in the court system. But it is. All of the legal moves thus far have been preliminary; the court has not yet judged annexation on its merits. But it’s been expensive nonetheless.

  • Hats off to dispatchers

    This week is Public Telecommunications Operators Week, an overly complex name for a time set aside each year to thank the people who answer the phone when we dial 911.

  • Look to self to spark a change for kids

    Sadly, you don’t have to look very far to find instances of child abuse. It might be happening in your own neighborhood, with few none-the-wiser. It might come from outright neglect, parents putting kids in undesirable situations through their drug use, or even sexual abuse.

    Social media has been abuzz in recent weeks surrounding the arrest of the Tell City Cinema owner jailed on several felony charges for alleged sexual misconduct with minors. Some have even taken to actively picket and boycott the business, and demanded it be sold.

  • Compromise needed to avoid government takeover of healthcare

    Trumpcare, the Republican plan to replace the Affordable Care Act known as Obamacare, failed to pass despite the Republicans having a majority in both houses of Congress. So where does U.S. healthcare go from here?

  • NEA funding has a place in the nation’s budget

    Finally, a common sense appeal for how to deal with continued funding of the arts.

    Former Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee explained it best in an op-ed in The Washington Post in defense of National Endowment of the Arts funding. He cites several benefits.

  • Crean’s teams simply did not win enough

    This editorial first appeared in the (Bloomington) Herald-Times.

     

    There’s a simple reason Indiana University athletic director Fred Glass had no choice but to fire men’s basketball coach Tom Crean.

    His teams didn’t win enough games enough seasons. Some years they did, but too many years, they didn’t.

  • Council should tread lightly on pet owners’ rights

    We understand the city’s desire to advance animal control in Tell City. However, we have concerns about the ordinance presented March 1 for discussion by the city council.

    We realize the ordinance was just a first draft but it would have limited to four the number of dogs and cats a person could have. That created a good bit of discussion and debate, during the meeting and among members of the public afterwards.

  • Failure a part of business, Can-Clay no exception

    Can-Clay is Perry County’s own concept of too big to fail. It’s at the citizenry’s hands to bear the brunt of practices that help failing business survive when the market or poor business practices says its time to close.

  • Guest editorial: Indiana dumps a problem on sheriffs

    House Bill 1006, which passed in 2015, was supposed to reduce prison crowding in Indiana by sending more low-level felons back to the counties where they were convicted.

    The idea was that the prisoners would be closer to their families, reducing the risk of recidivism after they finish their sentences.

    But it turns out that what the state was doing was creating enormous headaches for counties. While state prison beds were emptying, county jails were being filled beyond capacity and county budgets were being severely challenged.

  • Trump’s $54 billion increase in military spending unwarranted

    President Donald Trump presented a budget outline last week that included a $54 billion increase in defense spending and an equivalent decrease in non-defense, discretionary spending. We think our nation would be better served by a budget doing the opposite in each of those areas.

    Trump said the nearly 10 percent increase in the military budget is needed “to rebuild the depleted military of the United States of America at a time we most need it.”

    But our “depleted military” is a myth.