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Editorials

  • United Way deserves our renewed support

    United Way of Perry County’s yearly campaign is in full swing and your help is needed to make it a success. This year’s campaign hopes to raise $130,000 for support groups that provide important services in our community. Our combined gifts to United Way will help build our community and make Perry County a better place to live and work.

  • Ruling a victory for transparent government

     

    The Indiana Supreme Court’s ruling this month that causes of death are public records and must be available at county levels is a decision worth applauding.

    That we favor the ruling probably comes as no surprise. As journalists, we vigorously defend the concept of transparency in government. But the unanimous ruling released Tuesday, which reversed the lower courts’ decisions, is one that is in the best interests of all Indiana residents.

  • Bus safety: An important lesson for us all

    Back-to-school time has arrived and across Perry County, yellow school buses – and white activity buses – are traveling city streets, county roads and sate highways. Their precious cargo is our inspiration for writing.

    Drivers should be extra careful to watch for youngsters. There will also be an increase in pedestrian traffic, particularly around schools. Extra awareness is also required in rural areas where distracted or impatient drivers often ignore school buses when children are getting on or off.

  • Community pride is at the heart of Schweizer Fest

    There are already two columns about this week’s Schweizer Fest on this page so forgive a third news item. We can’t refrain from joining the refrain and sharing our thoughts about what the week ahead means to the community.

    Schweizer Fest, as nearly everyone knows, marks the Swiss-German heritage of the city. It marks the daring and determination of the first 1858 settlers who cleared – quite literally with their hands and pick axes – a future for themselves and future generations

  • Hello, Mr. and Mrs. Corporation

    On June 30, the Supreme Court of the United States sided with Hobby Lobby in a landmark decision that allows the for-profit business, owned by the Green family, the right to refuse – for religious reasons – to provide certain birth-control methods and services for their female employees.

  • Thumbs-up, thumbs-down to recent INDOT decisions

    The Indiana Department of Transportation has the unenviable responsibility of caring for more than 11,000 miles of highway, not to mention, 6,000 bridges, overpasses, welcome center and rest areas and rail crossings. Most of the decisions the state agency renders are good ones and often go unnoticed and unheralded. It’s the shortcomings by INDOT that make news headlines and generate complaints. Today, we  thank INDOT for one set of decisions and criticize it for another.

    First, the good news.

  • Going to war in Iraq won’t work any better this time

    Insanity is sometimes defined as doing the same thing repeatedly and expecting different results. By that definition, the United States’ engaging in military action in Iraq now would be insane.

    It didn’t work before, which is why there is basically a civil war going on there now. As we said before, the only way the United States can control who governs Iraq is to make it a permanent U.S. territory or state, which few, if any, would be willing to do.

  • School board: Use trust fund as it was intended

    In 2012, the state attorney general rebuked former Cannelton Schools Superintendent Al Chapman for improperly using the Dorothy von Solbrig Income Trust Fund.

    Current Superintendent Alva Sibbitt Jr. told the board June 19 a settlement agreement reached last month means the trust fund can now be used to pay any legitimate corporation bills. Almost immediately and on his recommendation, as we report in this edition, the school board voted unanimously and without discussion to spend $18,000 from the fund on legal bills.

  • EDITORIAL: Keep kids reading to avoid summer slide

    School has been out for a few weeks now, and most kids are enjoying an easier, more carefree schedule.

    Unfortunately, the majority of students have already lost some of the academic gains made during the school year. A good number have even dropped in reading level.

    This decline, coined ‘summer slide’ by educators, refers to learning loss that occurs over summer break. Studies estimate the average student may lose up to a full month’s worth of instruction, dropping in reading aptitude by up to one grade level.

  • EDITORIAL: Timing curious for EPA announcement

    Most responsible citizens don’t want to destroy their environment, but most people also don’t want to pay sharply higher utility bills or hurt their state’s economy when it is still recovering from the Great Recession.

    Many people say the latter cases will be the trade-off that states that rely heavily on coal to produce electricity will face as a result of the Obama administration’s edict last week that existing power plants must reduce their carbon emissions 30 percent from 2005 levels by 2030.