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Editorials

  • Tariff would be a threat to local newspapers

    There are two things you need to know about newspapers.

    Newspapers are important to community life and democracy. Always have been. We at the National Newspaper Association think it is important for all sorts of newspapers to survive for the sake of a free society – the very large and the very small ones, the liberal ones, the conservative ones, the middle-of-the-road ones, the ones with no viewpoint but just important news, all of them. Some are our members. Many are not. We defend them anyway. America needs them like we need oxygen.

  • Step up for children in need

    It’s often said that no one really knows what takes place behind closed doors. Smiles and laughter often shield the world from real pain hiding beneath. And when it comes to children, their strife is often the result of being caught in the cross-hairs of an adult issue.

    With April being Child Abuse Prevention Month, we encourage all who can to get involved in helping safeguard our children. There are numerous ways in this community to do so.

  • Make your voices heard on local environmental issues

    With all the recent discussion and debate on the pros and cons of a proposed $2.5 billion coal-to-diesel plant that may be coming to the Dale area, it’s heartening to know citizens have a big heart for their community.

    A desire to protect our county’s water, air and soil shows a strong sense of community, as does a desire to provide investment and jobs.

  • Hospital is on right financial track

    It’s good to see Perry County Memorial Hospital doing better financially. As we report in today’s issue, the hospital earned more than $455,686 in the first two months of the year. That follows a financially challenging 2017 in which the hospital basically broke even.

    We reported on the relatively small number of jobs that were cut last year and other positions that were eliminated in an effort to reduce costs as revenue fell below the hospital’s budget.

  • Rokita lacks courage to step to the debate plate

    April 30.

    That’s the date of a scheduled televised statewide debate organized by the independent Indiana Debate Commission.

    Who will be participating? Republican U.S. Senate candidates Mike Braun and Luke Messer.

    Who won’t be participating? U.S. Rep. Todd Rokita.

    The three are competing to face Democrat Sen. Joe Donnelly in November. So, why no Rokita?

  • Good job, Branchville United Methodist Church

    In a time when Americans’ weekly church attendance is declining, it’s good to see that Perry County’s congregations are holding their own and in some cases, even growing.

    We congratulate Branchville United Methodist Church for recently completing its new church home. It replaces a smaller structure across the road

  • Respect for free press at risk

     

    Three excited young women appear strategically for TV shots behind President Donald Trump at the podium as he addresses a fervid campaign rally in an airport hangar outside Pittsburgh Saturday.

    They madly wave placards declaring “Women for Trump” and “Make America Strong Again” and jump up and down in pavlovian response to his cutting insults of the news media and whenever the crowd breaks out in chants of “CNN sucks!”

  • Politicians’ favorite words and phrases

     

    After more than 20 years in the journalism business, I’ve seen about every political message imaginable, from newspaper ads and 20-page manifestos to billboards and email blasts. I’ve moderated political forums that have ranged from the mild to the wild.

    On Election Day, I’ve collected everything from cards to combs, Emory boards to hand fans.

  • Resource officers a school essential

    While still in the planning stages, a unified effort among Perry County schools aiming to find funding for a shared school resource officer is a step in the right direction. Just as it has been for decades, school safety is a paramount goal for not only those overseeing programs but for parents too. As for kids, security has become the norm for students, so the addition of a guard wouldn’t likely be much of an intrusion for most; only to those in the wrong.

  • CVB gift shop will be missed

    We were disappointed to learn that the Perry County Convention and Visitors Bureau, whose office is located inside the Tell City Depot on Seventh Street, is phasing out its gift shop.

    We don’t regularly cover meetings of the CVB board but, as we understand it, the vote to close the gift shop divided its members, with some in favor of the decision while others wanted the store to stay.