• The cost of higher education is too high

    From quite a young age, American kids have the importance of a college education impressed upon them by teachers and family members alike. Many times, these people didn’t go to college themselves and speak from a place of regret for not having attended. Other times, the advice to go to college is from the point of view of someone who has been and who benefited from it.

    While there are many things in common with the college experience of generations before and the current college students, there is one glaring difference. The price has skyrocketed.

  • Presidential debates should stick to issues

    A record number of people watched the first debate between presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, with most probably hoping to learn more about each candidate’s stand on the major issues facing our country.

    Instead viewers heard the type of name calling that one might expect to hear on a grade school playground, but little about the issues.

  • Share your voice this year:

    Commit now to voting In Indiana, you must be a registered voter to cast a ballot, and there are a few ways to do so. Hoosiers with a valid Indiana driver’s license or state ID can register to vote online at indianavoters.com. State voter registration forms also can be downloaded at indianavoters.com.

    Don’t have access to a computer? Call the Indiana Election Division at (800) 622-4941 or your county voter registration office to request a form be mailed to you.

  • Politics going out of redistricting?

    Here’s the best news we’ve heard from the General Assembly in a while: It looks like Hoosier lawmakers at least will consider putting a citizen commission in charge of the once-a-decade process of redrawing legislative district boundaries. That would end the practice of gerrymandering, in which the party in power draws district lines not for the common good but to strengthen its own chance of retaining incumbency.

  • Give kids time to eat lunch

    A change.org petition was filed Aug. 25, demanding the Evansville Vanderburgh School Corp. lengthen the amount of time its elementary-aged kids get to eat their midday meal.

    “EVSC has Elementary school lunch set at 20 mins. In that 20 mins, a child must wait in a line, get their food, find a seat, get everything opened and eat,” states the petition, filed by Jenni Webster.

  • National anthem not the time to stage protests

    Colin Kaepernick, a quarterback for the San Francisco 49ers, in the National Football League, has gained more publicity lately for what he does before the games than during them.

    Specifically, he has decided not to stand during the playing of the national anthem.

  • Small town crime, punishments should come with local influence

    Experts reached by The New York Times for a story about the high number and severity of prison sentences in small towns seem horrified over the disparity between that toughness and the relative laxness in large metropolitan areas. They say the size of the disparities undercuts the basic promise of equal protection under the law.

  • Take part in bicentennial torch’s visit on Friday

    The much anticipated Bicentennial Torch Relay will reach Perry County this Friday, and with it will highlight much of what is great about our community. Respected citizens from nearly every community will help cast a statewide eye on what we have to offer as they carry the torch.

    Much like the Olympic procession, the local parade of relayers chronicles what makes us unique as well as promoting togetherness. The Torch Relay was incorporated into the state’s yearlong birthday party to inspire and unify Hoosiers. And in Perry County, our neighborly ties run deep.

  • United Way deserves the community’s support

    United Way of Perry County’s yearly campaign is in full swing and once again your help is needed to make it a success. This year’s campaign hopes to raise $130,000 for support groups that provide important services in our community, but the Indiana Association of United Ways is offering to match new and increased gifts. That means up to another $20,000 to help build our community and make Perry County a better place to live and work.

  • Indiana’s teacher evaluations not working

    As we have seen with the continuing struggle to replace the hated ISTEP, members of the Indiana education establishment has difficulty with the whole testing concept — what to test, how to test it, what to do with the results.

    Now it appears they even have trouble testing the teachers who give the tests. Indiana lawmakers put the a statewide evaluation system in place in 2011 with the goal of raising expectations for teachers to keep improving their performance. It was also supposed to identify teachers in need of improvement or removal from the classroom.