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Editorials

  • Hello, Mr. and Mrs. Corporation

    On June 30, the Supreme Court of the United States sided with Hobby Lobby in a landmark decision that allows the for-profit business, owned by the Green family, the right to refuse – for religious reasons – to provide certain birth-control methods and services for their female employees.

  • Thumbs-up, thumbs-down to recent INDOT decisions

    The Indiana Department of Transportation has the unenviable responsibility of caring for more than 11,000 miles of highway, not to mention, 6,000 bridges, overpasses, welcome center and rest areas and rail crossings. Most of the decisions the state agency renders are good ones and often go unnoticed and unheralded. It’s the shortcomings by INDOT that make news headlines and generate complaints. Today, we  thank INDOT for one set of decisions and criticize it for another.

    First, the good news.

  • Going to war in Iraq won’t work any better this time

    Insanity is sometimes defined as doing the same thing repeatedly and expecting different results. By that definition, the United States’ engaging in military action in Iraq now would be insane.

    It didn’t work before, which is why there is basically a civil war going on there now. As we said before, the only way the United States can control who governs Iraq is to make it a permanent U.S. territory or state, which few, if any, would be willing to do.

  • School board: Use trust fund as it was intended

    In 2012, the state attorney general rebuked former Cannelton Schools Superintendent Al Chapman for improperly using the Dorothy von Solbrig Income Trust Fund.

    Current Superintendent Alva Sibbitt Jr. told the board June 19 a settlement agreement reached last month means the trust fund can now be used to pay any legitimate corporation bills. Almost immediately and on his recommendation, as we report in this edition, the school board voted unanimously and without discussion to spend $18,000 from the fund on legal bills.

  • EDITORIAL: Keep kids reading to avoid summer slide

    School has been out for a few weeks now, and most kids are enjoying an easier, more carefree schedule.

    Unfortunately, the majority of students have already lost some of the academic gains made during the school year. A good number have even dropped in reading level.

    This decline, coined ‘summer slide’ by educators, refers to learning loss that occurs over summer break. Studies estimate the average student may lose up to a full month’s worth of instruction, dropping in reading aptitude by up to one grade level.

  • EDITORIAL: Timing curious for EPA announcement

    Most responsible citizens don’t want to destroy their environment, but most people also don’t want to pay sharply higher utility bills or hurt their state’s economy when it is still recovering from the Great Recession.

    Many people say the latter cases will be the trade-off that states that rely heavily on coal to produce electricity will face as a result of the Obama administration’s edict last week that existing power plants must reduce their carbon emissions 30 percent from 2005 levels by 2030.

  • Honoring our most recently fallen heroes

    Since the American Civil War brought the full horror of warfare to American shores, the United States has observed a day late in May as a time of remembrance and reflection for our nation’s war dead. Since then, too many more have joined the hundreds of thousands from that 19th century calamity.

  • Base annexation debate on the facts, not rumors

    The Perry County News hasn’t taken a direct stand on Tell City’s annexation effort.  We did publish an editorial finding some fault with the ordinance eventually adopted by the city council in April, but we have not stated our view on whether annexation should happen or not.

    The entire process is currently in a 90-day period during which a remonstrance can be filed. An effort to gather signatures needed for a formal challenge is under way and apparently making good process.

  • Scary green alien trapped by government official

    Yep, you read that right. Aliens are threatening Perry County’s borders. No longer the stuff of science fiction, the metallic green aliens with large eyes, long flat backs and numerous legs have found us.

    But don’t run panicking into the streets just yet, scanning the skies for UFOs. Instead, look closely at your woodpiles, the bundles of firewood for sale, the beautiful ash trees shading your front yards.

  • Welcoming committee would be asset to community

    Last week, the News published an article by guest columnist Shawn Jones about the possible formation of a welcoming committee in Perry County. The community outreach group would serve to identify and support individuals and families new to the area and would be created by Quality of Life, a subgroup of the Perry County Development Corp.

    According to Jones, the group is currently working to create such a committee. We hope they do.