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Editorials

  • More-sensitive signals would negate need for new law

    Some vehicles can now legally run red lights in Indiana, and we’re not talking about just making right turns on red.

    The state legislature approved a bill and Gov. Mike Spence signed it March 27 allowing two-wheeled vehicles, including motorcycles, scooters and bicycles, to proceed through a red light after two minutes if they make sure the intersection is clear first.

  • Farmers markets growing; you’re invited to learn more

    An April 14 meeting at the Tell City Depot will share details of Perry County’s upcoming farmers market. We hope the turnout is large since the popularity of local markets in general and Perry County’s in particular is – pardon the pun – growing.

    If you didn’t make it to last year’s market, held at the Depot each Wednesday and Saturday, you missed out on a great selection of locally grown fruits and vegetables. Crowds were large, vendors made money and the community found a regular supply of nutritious food.

  • Facts point to benefits of reducing, reusing and recycling

    With the county’s recycling bills due last Saturday, many of us turned our thoughts to empty bottles and old newspapers as we wrote our checks to the Perry County Recycling Management District. Some of us paid the bill without hesitation, some of us grumbled as we stamped the envelope and dropped it into the mail. A few of us may not have paid it at all.

    However we feel about recycling and the annual $32 fee, all property owners, residential or commercial, in the county that generate trash are required to foot the bill.

  • Fish & Wildlife should ease Eagles Bluff restrictions

    The Perry County Parks and Recreation Department would like to put camping facilities for recreational vehicles at its Eagles Bluff Park but is barred from doing so under terms its board agreed to when it acquired the land from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service in 2000.

    Times and conditions change, and we believe the camping facilities should be permitted, as they would be a money-maker for the parks department and keep it from being dependent on only grants and money from tight federal government budgets to fund its projects.

  • County should support quicker ambulance responses

     

    We don’t have statistics to back us up, but feel it’s safe to say people in general are reluctant to voluntarily pay more taxes.

    If we did have stats, we’re sure we could show that most of the approximately 45 people who assembled in the commissioners room at the county courthouse Jan. 23 were a statistical anomaly. As we reported Jan. 30, all or nearly all of them raised their hands when County Councilman Ron Crawford ask-end at a meeting Jan. 23 how many would support a tax increase to fund ambulance service based at the county garage.

  • Tax burden must be fair

    Local government leaders are anxiously watching the Indiana Legislature as it tinkers with yet another form of taxation this session.

    When word first started filtering out that eliminating a major source of income to cities and towns, the business personal property tax, was high on Gov. Mike Pence’s list, local government leaders became nervous. In a story published last Monday, we reported that the loss of revenue for Tell City alone could exceed $450,000.

  • Bill to standardize weather siren activation makes sense

    While most Perry Countians’ weather concerns are focused on winter, the threat of severe storms and tornadoes is always with us, no matter the season.

    A bill introduced this month in the Indiana Legislature may give some direction on one of the important ways many of us are alerted to pending severe weather, the thousands of warning sirens across our state.

  • City groups protecting look of downtown

    The meeting went quickly and there was no official action taken so the last meeting of the Tell City Technical Advisory Committee didn’t generate a story. However, we were happy to hear some of the comments made by committee members about the need to support development while ensuring new construction and renovation in the city are compatible with the surrounding areas.

  • Silvesternacht sure to become a Tell City tradition

    Congratulations to Tell City on a successful second Silvesternacht. Some of our staff were among the crowd that packed City Hall Park Tuesday night for the New Year’s Eve festivities.

    We echo the comments of many who voiced their appreciation that night for an opportunity to gather – as families and a community – to celebrate the arrival of 2014.

  • Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus

    Editor’s Note: In the months before the Christmas of 1897, an 8-year-old girl named Virginia O’Hanlon wrote a letter to the New York Sun, asking if there really was a Santa Claus. Edward P. Mitchell gave the assignment to Francis P. Church, whose reply to Virginia appeared in the Sept. 21, 1897, edition of the Sun. Virginia’s letter and Church’s reply, as it appeared in the Sun, are reprinted below. Virginia O’Hanlon Douglas died May 13, 1971.

    Is there a Santa Claus?