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Columns

  • OK at times to be scooped

    Vince Luecke

    Editor

    editor@perry countynews.com

     

    No journalist likes being scooped, especially this one. I used to moan and groan when another TV station or newspaper ran a story I was already working on. In the old days, weekly and twice-weekly newspapers like ours couldn’t do much between issues. We occasionally held the paper for big events and once or twice printed early to get big stories in the public’s hands sooner.

  • Thinking of spring? Cool start best for bulbs

    Jeneen Wiche

    Weekend Gardener

     

    Don’t jump the gun when it comes to planting spring flowering bulbs this fall. Spring bulbs are best planted once soil temperatures cool to about 55 degrees, so wait until we have had at least two weeks of sweater weather.  If it is too cool outside without a jacket then it’s just right for planting bulbs.

  • Grant funds benefit Tell City

    Lloyd Arnold

    Rep. District 74

     

    Indiana continues to work towards improving the safety of Hoosiers as well as raising the quality of life for all its residents. In order to do so, we must maintain the current housing stock in our communities and make sure those residents are in homes that are safe and easily accessible.

    The Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority helps to ensure we preserve Indiana’s housing through partnerships and grants.

  • Throw the bums out

    DONALD NEWELL

    GUEST COLUMNIST

     

    “Throw the bums out!” - a term commonly used in American politics when a group of elected officials is so bad that the damage they cause can only be stopped by replacing the entire group.

    On Aug. 12 the Perry County Council held a public meeting to discuss the possibility of levying a public safety tax of up to .25 percent of taxable income on Perry County residents.  I was one of about 50 citizens that attended, and one of a dozen or or more that spoke.

  • Asian lady beetle infestations stem from the sunny south side

    Jeneen Wiche

    Weekend Gardener

     

  • An education in empathy

    GLENN AUGUSTINE

    GUEST COLUMNIST

     

    A quick scan of Indiana’s headlines shows teenagers either in or behind the crosshairs of violence. On Oct. 23, a 16-year-old Fort Wayne girl and her 21-year-old brother were fatally shot just one day after their 20-year-old brother met the same fate.

    In July, an Indianapolis teen was sentenced to 55 years in prison for the 2014 murder of a young father-to-be, a crime the teen committed when he was 16.

  • Enjoy life: eat a burger

    Zane Clodfelter

    Guest Columnist

     

    If you didn’t see this in the news on Monday, let me take this opportunity to add to the list of unnecessary worries in your life.

    The World Health Organization released a report that detailed the link between eating meat and cancer.

    Clearly I’ve eaten one or two cheeseburgers in my lifetime, or this week, so this news was depressing to say the least.

  • Sustaining dual credit programs for high school students

    Erin Houchin

    State Senate District 47

     

    Indiana’s extensive dual credit opportunities provide many benefits for high school students throughout the state. By completing dual credit courses, students can earn high school and college credits simultaneously. These courses are taught by high school or college educators either at high schools, colleges or universities, or in an online setting.

  • Supporting the fight against breast cancer

    Joe Donnelly

    United States Senate

     

    This month is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, a time when we rally around our mothers, daughters, sisters, grandmothers, aunts and wives who bravely fight this disease and those who have survived it. We also remember the loved ones we have lost.

    Like so many Hoosiers and Americans, I reflect on my own personal connection to breast cancer. My mother lost her fight to breast cancer when I was just 10 years old.

  • Congress’s problems are deep-seated but fixable

    Lee Hamilton

    Center on Congress

     

    A lot of ink is being spilled about the speakership drama in the U.S. House, the demands by members of the conservative Freedom Caucus, and the turmoil besetting the Republicans who run Capitol Hill. There is a pervasive sense in Washington that Congress has gone, at least temporarily, off the rails.