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Columns

  • COLUMN: War and the Christmas Truce

    By JIM ADKINS, Guest Columnist

    World War I began in August of 1914. Tragically, by December, thousands of young men had died and the war was at a stalemate. Trench warfare had begun and countless German and British boys were cold, scared and homesick. The Christmas season only made matters worse as the soldiers reflected on past holiday seasons spent in warm homes amidst loved ones.

    For many, it seemed that things couldn’t get much worse.

  • COLUMN: Holiday reflections on a favorite Christmas gift

    By DICK HEDRICK, By the Side of the Road

    The memory of my mother’s standard response when asked what she wanted for Christmas each year – “kind words” – has given me pause this holiday season. Being somewhat more materialistic, my response to the same question has always been “a gift certificate from a bookstore would be nice.” I try to be helpful.

  • COLUMN: A visit by St. Nicholas

    By VINCE LUECKE, Editor

    As of Friday morning, I had an old shoe ready for St. Nicholas’ visit Sunday night. With any luck, I will have found a few pieces of chocolate inside the shoe the next morning.

    Will I really get excited when I walk onto my porch Monday? Not really, but it’s worth keeping an old tradition and a reminder that some customs, no matter how far removed, are worthwhile.

  • COLUMN: Dwayne Johnson back in action

    ERIC HARRIS, Film Review

  • A look at referenda results

    The November election saw 18 school referenda in Indiana. Six passed; 12 were defeated. Why were there so many referenda? And what explains the results?
    We have two kinds of school referenda in Indiana. Voters must approve property taxes for most big construction projects. This requirement came from the 2008 tax reform, and since that November there have been 32 school capital projects referenda. Eleven have passed. That's 34 percent. Two out of five passed on Nov. 2, a slightly higher 40 percent.

  • Things this smart German boy can, can’t do

    An old priest in Cincinnati with the last name of Schmidt used to assure me there was nothing a smart German boy couldn’t do. He made me a believer. The man made beer and wine, played the violin, spoke several languages and though advanced in years when I knew him, tended his own garden, made his own horseradish and was an expert pistol marksmen and woodcarver. He was a well-loved priest, too.

  • COLUMN: A reason to celebrate Thanksgiving

    FRANK SANDAGE, Guest Columnist

    In my long study of our American Civil War, I have come to understand the reasons for a Thanksgiving holiday.

    On Oct. 3, 1863, just after the Union Army won battles at Vicksburg, Miss., and Gettysburg, Pa., Abraham Lincoln issued a presidential proclamation designating the last Thursday of November. “a day of thanksgiving and praise to our beneficient father who dwelleth in the heaven.”

  • COLUMN: A temporary taste of hell

    By VINCE LUECKE, Editor

    They say a photo is worth 1,000 words. If so, this flattering shot of me suffering from the effects of a run-in with police pepper spray is priceless.

    Over the past couple of weeks, I’ve taken part in a class for future Tell City reserve police officers. One of the requirements asked of volunteers – reserve officers aren’t paid – is to take a dose of pepper spray in the face.

  • COLUMN: ‘Due Date’ lacks heart, but is still enjoyable

    ERIC HARRIS, Film Review

    Comedy is my least favorite genre to review. I love a good comedy as much as anyone, don’t get me wrong, but to critique it is an exercise in futility. Comedy is subjective; it’s all about a viewer’s personal sense of humor.  I suppose one could make this argument for all genres of film, but I find comedies are much more susceptible to divisiveness.  The point is, I can’t tell you whether or not “Due Date” is funny; I can only tell you if I thought it was funny.  

  • COLUMN: Stepping stones to re-entry

    EDWIN BUSS, Guest Columnist

    Albert Einstein once said, “Insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.” Like so many things in a challenging economy, corrections as we know it must change if we want to expect different results.