• Little trees, big future

    Vince Luecke


    editor@perry countynews.com


    Saint Meinrad Archabbey might be home someday to some of the largest trees on the planet … in about 2,000 years.

    Several small seedings of giant sequoia trees were recently planted on the grounds, and while the trees are very small now, they hopefully have big futures awaiting them.

  • Choice is clear: It’s Trump or bust




    The upcoming presidential election is, in my opinion, the most important in our nation’s history. It will essentially be a referendum on whether or not the United States is what our founders intended it to be.

  • Preparation key to combating summer powdery mildew




    Powdery mildew is probably the most common garden fungi around. It is not too terribly picky about where it spreads. It likes humid and dry weather, thrives in the heat of the summer and is hard to control once it has started. The trick here is to prevent it from happening by proper plant selection, spacing and treatment before it takes hold.

  • Give historical credit where credit is due




    It is a historical fact that on the rainy night of May 8-9, 1825, the steamboat, Mechanic, sank in the Ohio River with the Marquis de Lafayette aboard. Several varying narratives of the shipwreck, have been recorded, and each makes separate claims to the authenticity.

    First, a brief sketch of the official legend, from Thomas De la Hunt’s “History of Perry County,” written in 1916, 91 years after the shipwreck.  

  • It’s time to safeguard the future of Rome’s courthouse

    Vince Luecke


    editor@perry countynews.com


    I like the way newspaper editors wrote 50, 75 and even 100 years ago. There is a certain authoritative flair to their words, particularly in editorials. The opinion piece that follows my portion of this column ran in 1966 on the future of the Rome Courthouse. The building’s use as a school had ended with the construction of Perry Central and there were concerns on what would happen to the historic building.

  • Ku Klux Klan had short-lived but powerful history in Indiana

    Andrea Neal

    Guest Columnist


    Andrea Neal  is a teacher at St. Richard’s Episcopal School in Indianapolis and adjunct scholar with the Indiana Policy Review Foundation.  This is one of a series of articles leading up to the state’s bicentennial in December.


    During the 1920s, the Ku Klux Klan took Indiana by storm. Ninety years later, Hoosiers still struggle to grasp why.

  • Stuber led hospital well

    Seventeen years is a long time in any position and few jobs in a community are as important as administrator of a local hospital. Joe Stuber has shouldered the duties of Perry County Memorial Hospital well and as he caps his career, we wish him well and thank him for a job well done.

    Stuber retired last week after holding the position of hospital president and chief executive officer since 1999.

  • New laws promote a healthier Indiana

    Lloyd Arnold

    Indiana House District 74


    Many new laws will take effect on July 1 that reflect our ongoing effort to improve the lives of all Hoosiers.

  • Dividing iris improves plant health, bloom

    Jeneen Wiche

    Weekend Gardener


    We have all asked the question, “why hasn’t my plant bloomed?” Sometimes the answer is as simple as not enough sunlight, not old enough, not cold enough or hot enough, etc.  In fact, it could be as simple as a little digging and dividing for some renewed blooming attitude.

  • For eligible Americans, voting should be easy

    Lee Hamilton

    Guest Columnist


    The elections process is not usually grist for inflammatory rhetoric. But this year has been different. Republican Donald Trump labeled the GOP primary process “crooked.” Democrat Bernie Sanders suggested his party’s use of super-delegates made its nominating process a “rigged system.” For many voters, the intricacies of voting rules quickly became a topic of overriding interest.