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Columns

  • COLUMN: Daffodils have stories to share

    By VINCE LUECKE, Editor

    I was driving past a rural cemetery last week and noticed clumps of daffodils around the fence surrounding the gravestones and even next to some graves. It was an old cemetery – the stones were worn and gray – but were well maintained. The grass around the stones was beginning to green and a weeping willow tree nearby, close to a pond, was already taking leaf in a shade of delicate green.

  • COLUMN: Freshmen GOP standing ground

    By STEVE DAVISSON & SUE ELLSPERMANN, Guest Columnists

    We entered the 2011 General Assembly with a passion to serve and a commitment to make a difference. Voters put us in charge to focus on jobs, a balanced budget with no new taxes and education improvement.

    In November we took an oath to uphold Indiana and our country’s constitution.  We quickly got to work attending training, submitting legislation that supported our districts, and prepared for the work ahead. 

  • COLUMN: Democrat House members trying to protect Hoosiers

    Gary Morton, Guest Columnist

  • COLUMN: Hoosiers want Right to Work

    By ROB BEISWINGER, Guest Columnist

    Make no mistake, Indiana is poised to start enjoying the freedom and economic prosperity that would come with becoming America’s 23rd Right to Work State – if only Gov. Mitch Daniels would stop standing in the way.

    And the really bad news in Gov. Daniels’ decision to appease Indiana’s union bosses is that Hoosier citizens are the ones paying the price.

  • COLUMN: Lenten obligations

    By VINCE LUECKE, Editor

    Lent is about here and while not everyone’s religious tradition observes the 40-day period before Easter, I suspect most people at least acknowledge its arrival.

  • COLUMN: Protesters rally at statehouse

    By RICHARD YOUNG, District 47 State Senator

    State senators worked long days and late nights to meet mid-session deadlines and advance Senate bills to the House for further consideration. Legislation that didn’t make it out of its house of origin is most likely dead for this session. Out of 1,206 proposals introduced in January by members of both chambers, 603 were Senate bills. This brief summary includes highlights of a few of the 198 bills approved by the Senate as well as other activities at the Statehouse.

  • COLUMN: Right to bear arms worth fighting for

    By CLARENCE LEATHERBURY, Guest Columnist

    On Jan, 8, 2011 my father, Douglas Leatherbury and I were driving down State Road 135 in his old reliable Ford pickup truck heading to our small Ohio River frontage farm in Perry County, Indiana. I remember twisting the knob on the radio searching for a good tune when I came across a news alert. I could hear the alarm in the man’s voice as he stated, “Democratic Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords was shot in the head at an event she held for her constituents at an Arizona grocery.”

  • COLUMN: You want to obey me

    By KEVIN KOELLING, Managing Editor

    Using mind tricks on your bosses to get the things you want?

    (I could use a raise.)

    That’s absolutely brilliant!

    (My cubicle should be bigger.)

    The Army’s psychological-operations experts, according to Rolling Stone magazine, have been turning their tactics on senators, who can give them large sums of cash. I’m not talking wallets thick with dead presidents, here. They were asking for billions!

  • COLUMN: ‘The King’s Speech’ is more than just Oscar bait

    By ERIC HARRIS, Film Review

    Every year a film is released that screams, “Oscar!” and this year that film is “The King’s Speech.” Unfortunately, some people are turned off by films that seem destined for awards because the very synopsis of such films come off as pretentious. It’s understandable why some would be put off by the story of a stuttering Duke of York (Colin Firth) in pre-WWII Britain.

    That’s right; “The King’s Speech” is all about a king with a speech impediment.

  • COLUMN: State education system needs reform

    MARCIA DAUBY, Guest Columnist

    After reading a recent opinion piece in the paper, I felt compelled to offer another view. I am very excited and hopeful teachers will be held accountable and their performance “graded.”

    Any teacher can show up at school at 6:45 a.m. My question is do these teachers let parents know they are there at that time? The answer is no.