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Columns

  • COLUMN: Threats to the family meal

    By DON COURSEY
    Guest Columnist

    Federal regulators recently roiled America’s farmers with the release of new rules for financial instruments. The Commodity Futures Trading Commission, one of the agencies charged with implementing the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act, officially announced the new requirements and said they would take effect by year’s end.

    What does Dodd-Frank, passed in response to the 2008 economic crisis and aimed at reforming a vast swathe of the financial sector, have to do with farmers?

  • COLUMN: Get your old shoes out

    By VINCE LUECKE
    Editor

    I haven’t yet decided which old shoe I am going to put out for St. Nicholas’ visit Wednesday night. With any luck, I will find a few pieces of chocolate inside the next morning.

    Last year I put the shoe outside my Tell City office and enjoyed several chocolate bars and assorted sweets. Someone who must not know me very well also deposited a small lump of coal. I got a kick out of that.

  • COLUMN: Looking over the fiscal cliff

    By LARRY DeBOER
    Guest Columnist

    Economics is not an experimental science. We can’t say to Congress, “Honorable ladies and gentlemen, please drastically raise taxes and cut spending all at once so we can measure the effects on the economy of changes in the federal government’s budget.” This is not what elected officials do.

    Except that’s just what is scheduled to happen come Jan. 1.

  • COLUMN: Keep marijuana illegal

    By VINCE LUECKE
    Editor

    Election Day wins by proponents of legalized marijuana have generated quite the buzz – sorry for the pun – in the past couple of weeks, as well as debate among several friends.

  • COLUMN: Elected officials’ ideas fine

    By EDDY HUFF
    Guest Columnist

    This is in opposition to the article in the News that was written by guest  columnist Don Swaney.

    My first question is to Vince Luecke, the editor: Why would you as editor have such an uninformed person writing an article for your paper?

  • COLUMN: Congress refuses to address vital issues

    By LEE HAMILTON
    Center on Congress

    With the elections over, Congress faces a full plate of tough issues when it reconvenes. There will be a lot of talk about fiscal matters, “grand bargains,” and sorting out party caucuses. But there’s one vitally important question we’re certain to hear nothing about.

  • COLUMN: Interstate Paranormal Investigations donates to county’s Little Warriors

    By BRUCE COLLINS
    Guest Columnist

    My name is Bruce Collins and I am the founder of Interstate Paranormal Investigations, otherwise known as IPI. I am writing to let you know how extremely proud I am of every single member of IPI as we have just completed a two-week fundraiser for a local grass roots organization known as the Perry County Little Warriors, which was established to assist five children from Perry County who are battling different types of childhood cancer and other chronic diseases.

  • COLUMN: Tell City plan isn’t practical

    By DON SWANEY
    Guest Columnist

    A Nov. 5, 2012 News article tells us the mayor and city council have grand plans to improve Tell City. We certainly need improvements. Paying outside experts for advice that our city management should be providing seems wasteful.

    We elect these people to run the city, but they can't make decisions without “expert advice.” Seems a little redundant to me.

    Let’s analyze the professional recommendations:

  • COLUMN: One mouse is too many

    By VINCE LUECKE
    Editor

    I simply don’t like mice, especially in my house. But there are mice in New Boston and a few have tried to spend the winter in my house. The skirmish – a war would imply there are a lot of mice sneaking in and actually there aren’t – has been under way for a few weeks. I’ve won and sent several mice to the graveyard – er the field behind my house.

  • COLUMN: Civil discourse and ideas

    By LEE HAMILTON
    Center for Congress

    The election of 2012 has called attention to how difficult it is for Americans to talk reasonably with one another about public policy challenges. Our civic dialogue — how we sort through issues and reason with one another — is too often lamentable.