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Columns

  • Camp fosters sense of independence, self-worth

    BY MEGAN GATWOOD
    Guest Columnist

    At Anderson Woods, a not-for-profit summer camp for those with special needs, new experiences are an everyday occurrence.

    Campers who make their way to the camp are met with an array of challenges and life-lasting lessons that enhance the experience of camping while nurturing an increased sense of independence and self-worth.

  • Parvo outbreak hits county

    By DEANNA LIMA

    Perry County has a good possibility of a parvovirus epidemic looming on the horizon. It has been brought to the attention of the Animal Welfare, Control and Education Board by several other animal organizations at their June 3 meeting that nine known cases have recently occurred. The outbreaks are county-wide and include Tell City, Cannelton, Troy and German Ridge areas.

  • Hoping for bingo on high

    By VINCE LUECKE
    Editor

    Life is at lot like a Sunday afternoon of bingo. Sooner or later everybody’s number is bound to come up.

    Bingo comes into my life only once a year. Every July, my home church, St. John Chrysostom in New Boston, throws its picnic. And like just about every church picnic everywhere, bingo is on the schedule.

    Church picnics take a lot of help to pull off, and everyone gets a job.

  • Each year, Anderson Woods touches campers, staff

    By NOAH GATWOOD
    Guest Columnist

    There are lots of activities that campers can look forward to at Anderson Woods. A not-for-profit summer camp for those with special needs, Anderson Woods is a summer staple for many local kids and adults who are looking for some quality time in the great outdoors.

    For others, however, summer camp is a new experience and it can be an anxious time.

  • The decline of youth sports leagues

    By BILL STANCZYKIEWICZ
    Guest Columnist

    Participation in organized youth sports leagues for baseball, football, basketball and soccer declined by 4 percent between 2008-12, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal. National experts speculate on several reasons for this decline, including a squeeze on family finances caused by the Great Recession, increased concern about injury and too many kids playing video games instead of the real thing.

  • Discover your family history

    By MOLLY HALL
    Guest Columnist

    To celebrate Perry County’s 200th year, a certificate and pin will be given at a pinning ceremony Nov. 1 to individuals who fill out a First Family of Perry County application.

    This program was set up to honor our Perry County ancestors who braved the virgin Indiana Territory through the end of the Civil War.
    For many, this program has brought awareness of whom their Perry County ancestors were, how they lived and believed and, for some, answered questions about their family’s folklore.

  • Save your skin from the sun

    By VINCE LUECKE
    Editor

    I recently spotted a teenager at a county fair with a painful looking sunburn. I didn’t know him so I don’t know how he got the burn, but he spent far too long in the sun with either no or definitely not enough sunscreen.

    I’ve been in his skin before. I try hard to avoid burns as an adult because I know increased sun damage increases the chances for all types of skin cancer, including the most serious, melanoma.

  • Serving on interim committees

    Richard Young
    District 47 State Senator

    Just because the latest session has concluded at the Statehouse doesn’t mean the hard work ends. This summer and fall I have been selected to serve on several interim study committees that will conduct in-depth research and analysis on numerous complex issues facing our state.

  • Don’t bully the breed

    Trina Severson
    Feature Writer
    lifestyles@perrycountynews.com

    Dog bites and attacks –  and the associated media coverage – have created quite a stir recently. Dog bites are serious stuff and, because of their size and lack of experience around dogs, children are at a much greater risk of being bitten and sustaining injury.

    As a community, we’re smart to recognize this as an issue and work toward solutions.

  • Perry Central offers the best of hometowns

    Jody French
    Guest Columnist

    Editor’s Note: This is one in an occasional series of articles by readers who have made Perry County their home or who have returned here after several years. Columns are coordinated by the Perry County Quality of Life Committee, which is an umbrella group of the Perry County Development Corp.