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Columns

  • COLUMN: Propane preparedness tips

    By RICHARD YOUNG
    District 47 State Senator

    Earlier this year, the U.S. Department of Transportation issued an emergency declaration for our region regarding a shortage of liquefied petroleum gases, better known as LPG or propane.

  • COLUMN: It’s time to plan your time capsule contributions

    By VINCE LUECKE
    Editor

    Perry County’s bicentennial celebration is only a month away and contributions are needed for a time-capsule that will be sealed shortly after the event.

    The News is gathering items on behalf of the county’s bicentennial committee and while a few items have been contributed, there is PLENTY of space left. Our partners in the project are Mulzer Crushed Stone and Huber Funeral Home.

  • COLUMN: School bus safety tips

    By LLOYD ARNOLD
    Guest Columnist

    Even though the school year is well under way, it is always important to remind our children about school bus safety. As a father of four boys and a licensed school bus driver who helps drive students to field trips and athletic events, I think about this topic often. I recently came across tips for school bus safety from the Indiana State Police, and I thought that I would share some with you this week.

  • COLUMN: The man trying to keep Cannelton Schools alive

    By VINCE LUECKE
    Editor

    Alva Sibbitt and I had breakfast a couple of weeks ago. We talked about a lot of things over the course of an hour. The focus was on his work as Cannelton City Schools superintendent.

  • Focusing on farmers

    By STATE REP. LLOYD ARNOLD
    District 74

    Agriculture is such a large aspect of Indiana’s communities, history and economy, so each year the General Assembly addresses issues that are brought forth by farmers and those in the industry from across the state.

    I was proud this year to support various efforts dealing with agriculture ranging from the release of animal veterinary records to agricultural seed testing.

  • Community owes Officer Micah Jackson a big thank you

    By VINCE LUECKE
    Editor

    Lots of people volunteer their time to worthwhile causes, but I can’t think of anyone I know who has devoted more of his time than Micah Jackson has to the Cannelton Police Department.

    Jackson has worked as a police reserve patrolman there for close to a decade and has given literally thousands of hours to the city and its residents. He’s also been a proud supporter of law enforcement across the county.

  • Where does the money go?

    Judy Perez
    Hoosier National Forest
     
    National forests belong to the American public. They are yours, mine and ours. So, you might ask, “Why can’t I do what I want when I am visiting the Hoosier National Forest?”

  • COLUMN - EPA efforts miss the mark

    By DONALD NEWELL
    Guest Columnist

    I recently moved to Perry County and as a Southern Indiana Power Co-op member received a request from Steve Seibert, the cooperative’s chief executive officer, to comment on the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed rule to regulate carbon-dioxide emissions from existing coal-fired power plants.

  • COLUMN - A visit by fairies?

    By VINCE LUECKE
    Editor

    I’ve heard of crop circles but Friday’s discovery of a mushroom circle on the family farm took me by surprise. I’d seen mushroom rings before but didn’t know much about the natural process that creates them or the sometimes eerie traditions associated with them.

    In fact, the rings are sometimes called fairy rings or elf circles. A little research turned up all kinds of interesting bits of history and lore.

  • As growing season nears end, cover crops prove multi-purpose

    Jeneen Wiche

    Weekend Gardner

    While I will admit that half of my vegetable garden looks dreadful, the other half is holding steady because we mulched paths with a heavy layer of wood chips, filled unplanted beds with cover crops and have weeded the rest by hand and hoe.  I started using cover crops about 5 years ago and I am sold on the multi-purpose usefulness.  

    While many disease pathogens winter over on plant debris and an equal amount remain viable in the soil it means we need to strategize to keep the garden relatively clean.