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Columns

  • COLUMN: Women with long legs

    By VINCE LUECKE
    Editor

    I showered with a woman Friday but it wasn’t as thrilling as you might imagine. My morning guest was a daddy long-legs spider that made its way into the shower.

    I was careful to keep her safe and hoisted her to the top of the door. I get small spiders in the shower each summer and sometimes they end up spiraling down the drain. The last half of summer is spider season it seems and my arachnid encounter Friday reminded me of a column I wrote a few years ago when I was living on the farm.

  • COLUMN: Looking back, Tell City was a great place to grow up

    JOE MORTON
    GUEST COLUMNIST
    Growing up in Tell City was, what I think most people would agree, the ideal small town experience. We lived in a town that was safe enough to give kids  freedom to roam around on their own, yet being a small town, your parents knew plenty of people who would tell them if you were seen breaking their rules.
    I came into my own as a preteenager in the early 1980s.

  • COLUMN: Enjoy the big week ahead

    Vince Luecke, Editor
    editor@perrycountynews.com

    For me, Schweizer Fest is a lot like some holidays. There is lots of extra work, so much in fact that finding time to enjoy the actual festivities can be a challenge.  

  • COLUMN: Local wineries help capture summer in a bottle

    BY Andy Hedinger

  • COLUMN: It’s hard to walk on water

    By VINCE LUECKE
    Editor

    Wishes do come true, at least on occasion and even when your request is for a bad driver to get pulled over by a cop.

    I was driving to Rockport for a meeting a few days ago when I noticed a sports car on my tail. All of a sudden, the driver smashed the gas, smoking his tires and passed me, but not before fishtailing in his lane of travel.

  • COLUMN: New tax costing Hoosier jobs

    By DAN COATS
    U.S. Senator

    For years, medical devices have been changing the lives of patients around the world.

    Prosthetic legs have enabled wounded soldiers to run again. Cardiac patients have had decades added to their lives because of artificial heart valves and stents. A variety of innovative equipment, from surgical tools to bed pans, has significantly enhanced the quality of care at hospitals and other medical facilities.

  • COLUMN: The war with meth continues

    By LLOYD ARNOLD
    District 74 State Representative

    Over the past few years, there has been an increase in meth-related crimes. Great Indiana communities like ours are built by Hoosier strength, perseverance and a caring attitude, but these guiding principles, which serve as the fabric of our society, are being deteriorated by the effects of meth.

  • COLUMN: We can help each other quit tobacco

    By SHARILYN FRANZMAN
    Guest Columnist

    In the past years Perry County Memorial Hospital, then Lincoln Hills Development Corp., managed grants to help Perry County residents in efforts to quit tobacco. The two organizations educated the community on the effects of secondhand smoke, assisted at health fairs, school events and much more.

  • COLUMN: Why trust is so important

    By LEE HAMILTON
    Center for Congress

    Back in June, Gallup released a survey that got a fair bit of attention for its headline finding: only 10 percent of Americans trust Congress as an institution.

    Think about it. If you walk into a cafe this morning and there are nine other people in there reading the paper or staring into their laptops, only one of you in the room has faith that the body charged with making our nation’s laws can do its job right.

  • COLUMN: ‘Train wreck’ of Obamacare cuts wages, work hours

    By LARRY BUCSHON
    Indiana 8th District Representative

    As the Obamacare “train wreck” unfolds, we continue to learn of the unintended, unnecessary and burdensome consequences of a law passed without a single bipartisan vote in Congress.

    Despite the president’s promise of lower health-care costs, premiums are rising for families and estimates show that because of Obamacare, more than 7 million Americans will lose their employer-provided insurance.