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Columns

  • Sharing a meal with loved ones

    By Vince Luecke
    Editor

    I dropped by a small roadside restaurant while traveling in France several years ago. While the liverwurst and blood sausage were worth writing about, memories of a chubby grandma and her bubble-blowing granddaughter will never be forgotten.

  • On the trail of Joe Biden

    By Don Steen

    Tuesday, Jan. 27, had been surprisingly merciful for what is usually a pretty hectic day for the news staff. The week’s edition of the Journal-Democrat was almost ready for the printers, the winter sun was already in retreat and I was looking forward to a long drive home down Indiana 66.

  • Coats: Repeal medical device tax

    Sen. Dan Coats
    Guest Columnist

    Winston Church-ill famously said that a nation trying to tax itself into prosperity “is like a man standing in a bucket and trying to lift himself up by the handle.”

    Unfortunately, one of Indiana’s most vibrant, growing industries is currently stuck in this position because of a small provision tucked away in the 2,000-page Obamacare law. The 2.3 percent excise tax on total sales of medical devices imposed by this law is hindering Hoosier innovation and job creation.

  • Love is in the air ... I guess

    Vince Luecke

    Editor

    I spied a dead skunk on Main Street in Tell City Friday morning and have seen and smelled other skunks – dead and alive – during recent travels.

    Yes, skunks are on the move as their mating season nears. Skunks burrow into their dens during winter but emerge from time to time to feed and, in late winter, to mate. I don’t know if the skunks I’ve seen are in the mood to mate or simply hungry. Perhaps their presence is a sign of an early spring. Who needs Groundhog Day (observed today)?

  • Strengthening Indiana’s education policy

    State Sen. Erin Houchin

     

    After meeting with dozens of teachers across southern Indiana in the last year, the first bill I decided to author as a state senator works to move Indiana’s I-READ reading assessment from third grade to second grade.

    My legislation, Senate Bill 169, requires students who do not pass the I-READ reading assessment in second grade to retake the test during the third grade, which allows for more time and opportunity to strengthen reading abilities.

  • Brussels sprouts making comeback

    Jeneen Wiche

    Brussels sprouts have made a comeback. It used to be that no one like them and they were hard to come by fresh.

    Old varieties have been greatly improved from those forced on you as a child. Equally, updated cooking methods probably can stand some credit for elevating the previously mushy, bitter Barbie-doll-head-sized cabbage to a crispy, nutty treat.

  • Strengthening Indiana's future

    State Rep.

    Lloyd Arnold

    With the first two weeks of the legislative session complete, things are off to an exciting start. I always enjoy reconnecting with colleagues and meeting new members of our team; however, the thing I look forward to most each session is the positive impact and difference I can make for Hoosiers in southwest Indiana.

  • Who is my brother?

    By VINCE LUECKE

    Editor’s note: This column first appeared in January 2004.

    I’ve been bothered by a brother the last couple of weeks. What’s been nagging me isn’t one of my biological brothers, but the word “brother.”

    Few words carry more meaning than brother, or mean so much. Have you used it lately? Can you remember how you used it?

  • Everyone needs forgiveness

    Vince Luecke

    Editor

    editor@perry countynews.com

    Editor’s Note: This column first appeared in January 2003.

    If rain could wash away sins, most umbrellas would go unused. A cold drizzle fell on a middle-aged man’s head as he trotted into a brightly-lit church one Sunday evening in upstate New York. I was on a short vacation and had ventured off the throughway looking for supper and a hotel.

  • Income redistribution won’t help middle class in long run

    DONALD NEWELL

    GUEST COLUMNIST

     

    Two of the traditional hallmarks of the middle class are that they work hard and save their money. Even the White House praises the middle class for having those virtues and claims to want to help them prosper.

    But on Jan. 13, U.S. Rep. Chris Van Hollen of Maryland proposed a new federal initiative that abandons any pretense of trying to promote opportunities for the middle class. Instead, it seeks to turn them into a whole new group of beneficiaries of government-mandated income redistribution.