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Today's News

  • Age-7-8 playoff champions
  • Human foozball coming to 2015 Schweizer Fest

    TELL CITY – The United Way of Perry County will sponsor Aug. 8 what organizers say should be a fun-filled, action-packed game of human foozball.

    Two teams of seven people, while holding on to a series of rotating poles, will try to shoot-kick a soccer ball through the opposing teams’ goal.

    Just like the table game, but with live people instead of wood figures or paddles. No back flip experience is required.

    The tourney will be held in City Hall Park between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m., with each game lasting 30 minutes.

  • Perry Childcare open house July 24

    TELL CITY – A ribbon-cutting ceremony and open house for Perry Childcare will take place at 10 a.m. Friday, July 24, at the center’s location at the SIRS building, 1012 31st Street in Tell City.

    The public is welcome to stop by between the 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. to meet the staff, tour the center and find out more information. Snacks and refreshments will be available.

  • Saturday farmers markets include breakfast

    TELL CITY – As if the abundant fruits and vegetables weren’t enough, Perry County’s farmers markets on Saturday now includes breakfast.

    Betty Cash, director of the Perry Convention and Visitors Bureau, said several vendors are offering a variety of food items each Saturday, including bacon, egg and cheese biscuits, sausage biscuits, cinnamon rolls and coffee.

  • Sign up now for Schweizer Fest Talent Show

    TELL CITY – Registration forms for this summer’s Schweizer Fest Talent Show are now available at the Perry County Chamber of Commerce office at 601 Main St., in the lobby at German American Bank in downtown Tell City, at Conner Floor Covering at 12th   and Tell streets, or by calling Sharilyn Franzman at (812) 719-3017.

  • American Cancer Society and Perry County fight back against cancer through annual Relay For Life event

    TELL CITY – On June 5, 275 of Perry County residents came together at the American Cancer Society Relay For Life of Perry County to help finish the fight against cancer.

    The event took place from 6 p.m. to midnight at City Hall Park in Tell City.

    The Relay For Life program is a community-based event where teams and individuals set up campsites at a City Hall Park in Tell City and take turns walking or running around City Hall.

  • Why county history is important and why you should support the Perry County Museum

    Editor’s Note: This story on the Perry County Courthouse Museum was penned by board member Eric Harris.

     

    You’ve probably heard things like, “History is important” and “Those who forget the past are condemned to repeat it,” since you were in your first history class. Those phrases, like most clichés, are true but not seriously considered. History truly is important, but it’s also interesting.

  • Perry County Community Foundation announces scholarships

    Sydney Goffinet is the recipient of the Branchville Correctional Facility Memorial Scholarship, a $990 scholarship administered through the Perry County Community Foundation.

    The scholarship was created by the Branchville Correctional Facility and is awarded each year to a Branchville employee or their dependents.

    Sydney was one of 33 students who were awarded a scholarship through a fund of the foundation. Each scholarship fund has its own unique student eligibility and selection criteria, which was created by the fund founder.

  • Ivory apocalypse: Market needs more product

    Stuart Cassidy

    Staff Writer

     

    As an American, I have only seen elephants at the usual places and never knowingly held a piece of ivory in my hand. Honestly, it’s not a top-of-mind topic for me. So, maybe, I’m out of touch with the fever-pitch necessity surrounding crushing theme behind the eradication of the ivory trade.

    “We’re not only crushing ivory, we’re crushing the ivory market.” U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell said during a recent demonstration.

  • Doors closed