.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • 100th day of school
  • Boosting revenue for Indiana counties with state and federal land

    State Rep. Lloyd Arnold

    District 74

     

    We are fortunate that some of the country’s best state and national parks are right here in Indiana. Every year, Hoosiers and out-of-state visitors enjoy these public parks and lakes in huge numbers. However, to counties where this beautiful land is located, it has been somewhat of a mixed blessing.

  • Reserve officer of the year
  • Unseasonable weather kicks off early spring burns

    TELL CITY – Unseasonably warm temperatures and low humidity have Hoosier National Forest staff planning prescribed burns earlier than normal. “We don’t usually get started until March,” said fuels specialist Jeremy Kolaks, “but this year we’re planning to burn this week if we can get the right winds.”

    He explained, “Each burn area requires a different ‘prescription,’ which determines what wind direction and speed, temperature and fuel moisture are required for any given burn to be ignited.”

  • Enforcing laws on the Hoosier National Forest

    TELL CITY – The Hoosier National Forest has two designated law enforcement officers, Jonathan Rice and Donald Kidd.

    Both individuals are certified federal law enforcement officers through the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center and have completed the Land Management Police Training Program at the Center. 

  • Brains and brawn
  • Cover to cover
  • Amphitheatre seeking volunteers for 2017 performances

    LINCOLN CITY – The Lincoln Amphitheatre is seeking volunteers for its 2017 performance series.

    Roles and responsibilities could vary from show to show, but primary areas the venue needs assistance are as ticket scanners, ushers, and concession workers.

    For their efforts, selected volunteers will receive a Lincoln Amphitheatre staff shirt, as well as free and discounted ticketing opportunities to all 2017 performances.

  • The threats to our representative democracy

    Lee Hamilton

    Guest Colunnist

     

    With so much turmoil in Washington and around the country these days, it’s easy to get caught up in the crises of the moment. These are, indeed, worth our attention – but so are longer-running developments that threaten the health of our representative democracy. I want to lay them out in one place, so that the most serious problems confronting our system don’t slip from our attention.

  • Enrollment figures might have area schools on edge

    The IHSAA won’t officially announce what class each school will be in for class sports the next two years until May 1.
    But Monday it did release the enrollment figures those classes will be based on. And several area schools may be on edge until those decisions are announced because they are obviously close to the dividing line between classes.
    Tell City’s enrollment is up from 389 two years ago to 421 now, so it’s almost a lock to go back to Class 2A in football after being in Class A for that sport the last two years.