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Today's News

  • Taylor, other UE players remembered 40 years later

    By LARRY GOFFINET

    Sports Editor

     

    Relatives, friends, classmates and fans of the University of Evansville basketball team members who were killed in the 1977 team plane crash gathered in UE’s Neu Chapel Wednesday evening for a 40th anniversary commemoration of the crash.

  • Secret Santa pays off $10K in toys at Walmart

    By VINCE LUECKE

    Editor

     

    TELL CITY – Either Santa Claus dressed incognito or a man filled with the spirit of Christmas brightened the holidays for scores of  local families this month when he paid for hundreds of toys on layaway at Tell City’s Walmart.

    A store employee confirmed Thursday that the man, who never gave his name, came to the store and spent just under $10,000. The money went toward toys that shoppers had placed on layaway. The employee said the man wanted to make sure his gift went toward toys.

  • Troy council eyeing community development strategies

    By DON STEEN

    Staff Writer

     

    TROY – The Troy Town Council has opted to continue its partnership with the Perry County Development Corp. for another year. The PCDC maintains this relationship with community governments across Perry County and county leadership itself, providing advice and representation in the area’s ongoing bid to promote development.

  • Parks board’s five-year plan still progressing

    By LARRY GOFFINET

    Sports Editor

     

    TELL CITY – Purdue University is still tabulating results of surveys about Perry County’s parks and “putting them in more readable form,” Perry County Recreation Director Greg Hendershot told the county parks board Wednesday.

    After the parks board receives the results, it must prioritize the wish list of survey respondents and submit a rough draft of the board’s five-year plan to the Indiana Department of Natural Resources by Jan. 15.

  • Winter hiking series scheduled

    PERRY COUNTY – Several winter and early spring hikes are planned at various locations in Perry County. The first hike was held Dec. 9 and the next excursion is set for Saturday, Jan. 6.

    This year’s series of hiking experiences, with a new coordinator, Vince Gagliardi, is made possible under a partnership with the Perry County Parks and Recreation Department and the Perry County Convention and Visitors Bureau.

  • Perry County Lilly Endowment Community Scholar named

    One Perry County student has been named the recipient of a four-year, full-tuition scholarship as the 2018 Lilly Endowment Community Scholar. Luke Bishop will receive a full-tuition scholarship to an accredited public or private nonprofit college or university in Indiana of his choice and a $900 yearly stipend for required books and equipment.

    Luke, a senior at Perry Central High School, is the son of James and Tara Bishop of Branchville.

  • Brooke Franzman profiled for work with special needs

    WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. – Okeeheelee Middle School teacher Brooke Franzman was recently profiled by the West Palm Beach, Fla., school for her work working with people with disabilities and helping them with everyday life skills, such as food shopping, banking, etc.

  • Our View: Don’t dump your junk. Stop littering!

    It’s a message often repeated but one that has apparently yet to sink in the minds of the litterbugs of Perry County whose ugly handiwork can be seen alongside highways and county roads.

  • Struggling with springerles

    Vince Luecke

    Editor

     

    editor@perry countynews.com

    Although I have the physique of a healthy eater, I’m no baker and the only cookies I’ve made as of late have come from two cubes of dough purchased from my school-age nieces and nephews. The cookies were OK but nowhere near as good as Mom’s made-from-scratch treats.

    As Christmas rolls around each year, it’s not visions of sugar plums that dance in my head, but springerles, buckeyes, bonbons and iced butter cookies.

  • Indiana has no jobs problem

    MICHAEL HICKS

    GUEST COLUMNIST

     

    There seems to be a widespread belief that what ails many an Indiana community could be remedied by a few more good-paying jobs.

    This conviction is so common that it leaks into political campaigns, forcing otherwise thoughtful candidates to succumb to the siren call of “jobs.”