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Today's News

  • Local River Sweep volunteers surpass 100

    TELL CITY - The River Sweep the preceding weekend was a success, Ken Smith said Thursday, with more than 100 people throughout the county participating in the annual cleanup of banks along the Ohio and other rivers and their tributaries.

    Speaking at a regular meeting of the Perry County Recycling Management District Board of Directors, the executive director for that agency said another successful cleanup occurred despite high temperatures and high water.

    He was disappointed, however, at the condition Tell City's Sunset Park was in.

  • Moose picnic kicks off Thursday

    TELL CITY — Moose Lodge 1424's annual Independence Day picnic will mark the holiday in grand style this week with rides, games, food and a big fireworks show Saturday night.

    Activities swing into gear Thursday in Zoercher-Bettinger Park on Tell City's north side, with meals, booths and entertainment daily through Saturday.

  • Bandon teen facing rape charge

    BANDON - A 17-year-old has been charged as an adult with rape, court records filed in Perry Circuit Court show.

    Joseph L. Alvey of 2022 Old Indiana 37, Bandon, faces a Class B felony. According to a probable-cause statement filed in Perry Circuit Court, the alleged rape took place within the last six months. The alleged victim told a health-care worker about the incident and state police were notified.

  • School board tries to control health costs

    LEOPOLD - Perry Central Community School Corp. leaders are working with its employees on ways to reduce or eliminate a projected $288,918 increase in health-insurance costs the district's superintendent said could lead to staff cuts.

    Like most public school systems in the state, Perry Central has trimmed costs to balance a budget impacted by reductions in state funding. The News reported in April the district would not replace retiring teachers or support staff and transfer some salaries to grant programs to reach a savings goal of $350,000.

  • Alcoa workers made right move in accepting contract

    Many Perry and Spencer Countians are among the 1,500 Local 104 United Steelworkers members who work at Alcoa's Warrick County plant, so the union's vote Thursday to accept a new four-year contract with the company was good news for our local economy.

  • Community's response to Gulf oil spill overwhelming

    A few weeks ago I stumbled across an article about one organization's efforts to assist in the Gulf oil spill cleanup.

    The organization, Matter of Trust, is an ecological public charity that was asking for the public's help in collecting human and animal hair (dog, cat, alpaca, sheep) along with nylons to make oil booms.

    Feeling helpless here in southern Indiana, I thought it would be a good way for our community to get involved with their cause.

  • The reasons I love Perry County

    Editor's Note: A Quality of Life Committee working under the auspices of the Perry County Development Corp. is partnering with The News to present stories of people who have moved to Perry County or who have returned here after several years away. Nancy Myers penned this month's view.

    I moved to Perry County almost nine years ago to work for the Hoosier National Forest in Tell City. I came from a national forest in Arizona near Phoenix that was very busy.

  • The long days of summer

    Last Monday was the longest day of the year, meaning the summer solstice had arrived and the sun was as high in the sky as it could go. I spent Monday slaving behind my desk but I did my best the previous Saturday and Sunday to take advantage of just about every minute of daylight. Come nightfall Sunday, my bones ached but I felt a bit of satisfaction.

  • Animals at Work
  • CPR Refresher

    The commissioners room in the county courthouse became a training center of sorts Wednesday evening as county rescue-squad members and dispatchers took part in a cardiopulmonary resuscitation recertification class. The group trained on adult- and infant-sized mannequins with compressible chests and tiltable heads. The use of automated external defibrillators was also demonstrated. AEDs located in many public buildings and schools, including the courthouse, provide immediate care for people suffering from sudden cardiac arrest.