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Today's News

  • Community's response to Gulf oil spill overwhelming

    A few weeks ago I stumbled across an article about one organization's efforts to assist in the Gulf oil spill cleanup.

    The organization, Matter of Trust, is an ecological public charity that was asking for the public's help in collecting human and animal hair (dog, cat, alpaca, sheep) along with nylons to make oil booms.

    Feeling helpless here in southern Indiana, I thought it would be a good way for our community to get involved with their cause.

  • The reasons I love Perry County

    Editor's Note: A Quality of Life Committee working under the auspices of the Perry County Development Corp. is partnering with The News to present stories of people who have moved to Perry County or who have returned here after several years away. Nancy Myers penned this month's view.

    I moved to Perry County almost nine years ago to work for the Hoosier National Forest in Tell City. I came from a national forest in Arizona near Phoenix that was very busy.

  • The long days of summer

    Last Monday was the longest day of the year, meaning the summer solstice had arrived and the sun was as high in the sky as it could go. I spent Monday slaving behind my desk but I did my best the previous Saturday and Sunday to take advantage of just about every minute of daylight. Come nightfall Sunday, my bones ached but I felt a bit of satisfaction.

  • Animals at Work
  • CPR Refresher

    The commissioners room in the county courthouse became a training center of sorts Wednesday evening as county rescue-squad members and dispatchers took part in a cardiopulmonary resuscitation recertification class. The group trained on adult- and infant-sized mannequins with compressible chests and tiltable heads. The use of automated external defibrillators was also demonstrated. AEDs located in many public buildings and schools, including the courthouse, provide immediate care for people suffering from sudden cardiac arrest.

  • Stuber shares hospital plans
  • Woodcrafters outslug Marksman Cab

    TELL CITY—Drew Mowery hit two doubles and a single as Woodcrafters beat Marksman Cab 14-9 in Tell City Babe Ruth League baseball Wednesday.

    The win pulled 9-5 Woodcrafters within half a game of 9-4 Marksman Cab in a battle for second place in the five-team league.

    Zach Flamion had two hits for Woodcrafters to back Mowery Wednesday.

    Drake Duke pitched the first four innings for Woodcrafters to earn the victory. He walked four and struck out two.

  • PC splits with Wolfpack

    LEOPOLD—Perry Central took advantage of a couple of Crawford County errors to beat the Wolfpack 5-2 in the second game of a Teen League baseball doubleheader Wednesday.

    The Wolfpack committed an error that led to three Perry Central runs in the first inning and another one that led to a run in the third inning.

    The Commodores had only four hits. But Tanner Cassidy and Andrew Mosby drove in runs with ground outs in the first inning and Stephen Hayes was hit by a pitch with the bases loaded to force in a run in the second inning.

  • Hair Razors finishes 8-0

    TELL CITY—Katelyn Kaufman hit a double and a single as Hair Razors beat Cash Waggner & Associates 14-2 Wednesday to finish the regular season undefeated in Tell City’s age-13-16 girls softball league.

    Kaufman was also the winning pitcher. She struck out seven and gave up two hits and two walks in four innings.

    Logan Flannagan and Allicyn Garrett each also had two hits for Hair Razors and Kira Maddle added a double.

    Kaufman and Maddle each drove in two runs.

  • Ress to retire in February

    INDIANAPOLIS—Tell City native Blake Ress announced Friday that he will retire as IHSAA commissioner Feb. 1, 2011.

    Ress, 68, began his tenure as the IHSAA’s seventh commissioner July 1, 2000, succeeding Bob Gardner.

    “I am genuinely appreciative for having had the opportunity to serve in this capacity for the past 10 years,” said Ress. “I have thoroughly enjoyed the experience and will treasure the memories.”

    Ress’ relationship with the IHSAA spans most of his adult life.