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Today's News

  • Leona and Preston Jones

    Preston “Bob” and Leona Jones will celebrate their 58th wedding anniversary March 2, 2011.

    Mr. Jones married the former Leona Hempfling March 2, 1953, in Hawes-ville, Ky.
    The couple have three children, Darla Brewster of Marengo, Debbe Jones of Cannelton and Diana Knight of Fayettville, N.C. They also have three grandchildren, six great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren.

  • Community Events, Feb. 28

    The Perry County News is pleased to announce events of local interest as a service to our readers and the community. Information should be sent to The News at P.O. Box 309, Tell City, IN 47586. Information can also be faxed to 547-2847 or e-mailed to lifestyles@perrycountynews.com. Please include a telephone number.

  • WTE Jumps Rope for Heart

    Students and staff filled the gym at William Tell Elementary School Feb. 9 for the annual Jump Rope For Heart event. Organized by physical education teacher Sally Stephenson for the past 32 years, students jumped rope to help the American Heart Association. More than $7,000 was raised for the association this year.
     

  • Tots Lots takes a trip to McDonald’s

    Tots Lots Preschool enjoyed a visit to McDonald's with a tour of the grill and storage area. They were then treated with ice cream.

  • Perry Central Lights-On workshop

    Renate Jobst, an extension educator for the Purdue Extension Agency, facilitated a workshop for the Perry Central Lights-On program recently.

    In the workshop, Jobst had groups of students wrap an egg with tape and straws. After a certain time, she stood on a chair and dropped the egg to see if the groups had protected their egg with the material given. The students then talked about theory, hypotheses and probability. Pictured with Jobst are Mallory Goffinet, Jaylynn Bryant, Emily Trammell, Wyatt Edwards, J.T. Smith, Ryan Thompson and Lena Rounds.
     

  • COLUMN: Protesters rally at statehouse

    By RICHARD YOUNG, District 47 State Senator

    State senators worked long days and late nights to meet mid-session deadlines and advance Senate bills to the House for further consideration. Legislation that didn’t make it out of its house of origin is most likely dead for this session. Out of 1,206 proposals introduced in January by members of both chambers, 603 were Senate bills. This brief summary includes highlights of a few of the 198 bills approved by the Senate as well as other activities at the Statehouse.

  • Education News, Feb. 28

    National Honor Society to host trivia night
    TELL CITY – Tell City Junior-Senior High School’s National Honor Society will host a charity trivia night Thursday, March 17. The event will begin at 6:30 p.m. and be held in the Bryan Taylor Sports Arena.
    There will be 10 rounds of 10 questions with each round relating to a different category. The teams may include five members of any age.
    The cost is $5 per student (high-school age and under) and $8 per adult. The deadline for entries is March 11.

  • COLUMN: Right to bear arms worth fighting for

    By CLARENCE LEATHERBURY, Guest Columnist

    On Jan, 8, 2011 my father, Douglas Leatherbury and I were driving down State Road 135 in his old reliable Ford pickup truck heading to our small Ohio River frontage farm in Perry County, Indiana. I remember twisting the knob on the radio searching for a good tune when I came across a news alert. I could hear the alarm in the man’s voice as he stated, “Democratic Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords was shot in the head at an event she held for her constituents at an Arizona grocery.”

  • COLUMN: You want to obey me

    By KEVIN KOELLING, Managing Editor

    Using mind tricks on your bosses to get the things you want?

    (I could use a raise.)

    That’s absolutely brilliant!

    (My cubicle should be bigger.)

    The Army’s psychological-operations experts, according to Rolling Stone magazine, have been turning their tactics on senators, who can give them large sums of cash. I’m not talking wallets thick with dead presidents, here. They were asking for billions!

  • EDITORIAL: It’s time for debate and compromise in Congress

    It can’t be said enough times. Politicians need to put aside party politics and start reaching across the aisles for compromise.

    If the past decade has taught us anything, it’s that our politicians need to wake up, listen to the people and start taking suggestions instead of fighting.

    Recent disagreements in Wisconsin and in our own state have seen a slightly disturbing event occur; Democrats refusing to vote on issues and fleeing state capitals for hiding instead of debating the issues at hand.