.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Hay loft memories

    Vince Luecke

    Editor

    editor@perry countynews.com

     

    Some people know they’re getting older and out of shape when they can’t hit the golf ball as far or as straight as they once did, or when once-comfortable pants no longer fit with as much ease.

    For me, the realization of my age and less-than-ideal physical condition comes with knowing I’m too out of shape to do some farm chores, including picking up hay. 

  • Our View: Let county parks board know what its priorities should be

    These days we can get inundated with surveys via telephone, mail and email. Of course many are not really important – in fact they are thinly disguised advertising for a product or political candidate.

    One survey that we think is important for Perry Countians to fill out, though, is the Perry County Parks Department’s community questionnaire for input on what to include in its upcoming five-year master plan.

  • LHDC celebrates 50th anniversary and elects officers for 2015

    During the 50th annual meeting of Lincoln Hills Development Corp. held April 20 at the Schergens Center in Tell City, board officers were elected for 2015. 

    Clayton Jefford of Perry County was elected president, Steve Upmeyer of Perry County was elected vice president; Beth Stein of Spencer County was elected secretary and Joan Hess of Perry County was elected treasurer.

  • Railroads transformed the Indiana Landscape

    ANDREA NEAL

    GUEST COLUMNIST

     

    Study a map from the late 19th century, and it’s easy to see how Indiana became known as the Crossroads of America. Like spokes on a bicycle wheel, railroad lines extended from Indianapolis in 12 directions. Tracks crossed the state from Lake Michigan to the Ohio River, Terre Haute to Richmond, and everywhere in between.

  • Fast tracking ‘Free trade’ agreements: A bad idea for America

    Editor’s Note: The legislation discussed in this letter was scheduled to be picked up by the House last Friday.

     

    Calvin Coolidge famously said “The business of America is business.”  That terse sentence summed up his rationale for minimizing government interference with American business, since, in his view, what was good for American business was good for American society as a whole. 

  • Tell City High School Class of 2015 Scholarship Recipients
  • Some signatures challenged in TC annexation case

    By VINCE LUECKE

    Editor

     

    TELL CITY – The next chapter in the court case challenging Tell City’s annexation efforts will likely focus on more than 100 names of remonstrators flagged by the county auditor’s office for various reasons, many of them over alleged inconsistencies in signatures.

  • William Tell Elementary to expand preschool program

    By STUART CASSIDY

    Staff Writer

     

    TELL CITY – The Tell City-Troy Township School Corp. plans to expand its preschool program. Starting in the upcoming 2015-16 school year, William Tell Elementary will add a Title 1 preschool, in addition to the one it currently has through the Dubois-Spencer-Perry Cooperative.  

    The preschool schedule will include half-day morning and afternoon sessions Monday through Thursday during the school year. Students must be 4 years old by Aug. 1 to be eligible.  

  • Changing of the Barbers

    By STUART CASSIDY

    Staff Writer

     

    TELL CITY – You can see it as you drive down the street: the red, white and blue just happens to catch the eye, and you know exactly what the business is. Barbershops have long-been community fixtures, a place not only to get a trim and a shave, but where friends meet and an extension of family.

    In 1974, Jody Fortwendel, then in his early 20s, bought an existing barbershop in Tell City that would mark the beginning of his own 40-plus year tradition.

  • Tell City schools to refinance bonds

    By STUART CASSIDY

    Staff Writer

     

    TELL CITY – The Tell City-Troy Township School Board took steps Tuesday to refinance several bonds, including one for $11 million used to build William Tell  Elementary and another for $3.3 million used to pay pensions. The refinancings will add to cash reserves the district can use to pay for future capital repairs.