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Local News

  • Booming youth
  • Offender labor offers boost to communities

    BRANCHVILLE - Labor provided by offenders at Branchville Correctional Facility supports communities across the county in ways sometimes not always visible to the public, members of the facility's advisory group learned during their last meeting.

    Offenders approved for outside work details provide manpower for construction projects, mowing and trash removal throughout the year.

  • Leads may solve Tell City burglary cases

    TELL CITY - Police officers in Tell City followed up on leads this week that may allow them to solve a recent series of residential burglaries.

    At the same time, officers reminded residents to keep doors locked, especially at night, and to report suspicious activity.

    "We have a person of interest who may be responsible for many of the break-ins, but perhaps not all of them," Lt. Alan Malone said Monday. He and Cpl. Marty Haughee are heading up the investigation.

  • Cardboard collection 'through the roof'

    County's chief recycler seeks collection ideas

    TELL CITY - The cost of discarding cardboard is "going through the roof," Paul Alvey said at a Sept. 18 meeting of the Perry County Recycling Management District Board of Directors, so businesses that have a lot to get rid of are looking for alternatives.

    The district collects the material from a number of businesses and turns that cost into profit by selling it to brokers, and "we can handle what we're getting and maybe some more," the district's executive director said, "but we need to figure out how to handle it."

  • Al Anon offers two podcasts for families

    PERRY COUNTY - Two new podcasts from Al Anon Family Groups describe how relatives and friends deal with the confusion and fear that a loved one's drinking can cause.

    "All six parts of the series, 'First Steps to Al Anon Recovery,' will be available by free subscription at www.AlAnonFamilyGroups.org," said Nicolette Stephens, information analyst for Al Anon's World Service Office.

  • Pioneer Days Oct. 3-4

    TROY - A beard contest and car show are only two of the many events going on for Troy Pioneer Days Friday and Saturday, Oct. 3-4.

    Friday events include Crosswinds performing from 6 to 9 p.m. and the beer garden opening at 5 p.m.

    Events Saturday begin with car-show registration at 8 a.m. The beer garden opens at noon with the pet show at 1 p.m. Other events include a talent show, fireworks and music by Tammy Cassidy.

    Food will be served both days and souvenirs include Troy history books, cook-books and T-shirts.

  • Hubert seeks sponsors

    TELL CITY - Ashley Hubert, who was crowed Miss Schweizer Fest 2008, will compete at the state festival pageant Nov. 8 at the Indianapolis Adams Mark Hotel.

    She is looking for Perry County businesses or individuals who want to promote themselves statewide as her sponsor.

    Any business or person interested can stop by or call Cinderella's at 547-1051 to fill out a sponsor form.

  • FSA extends sign-up deadline for programs

    ROCKPORT - Farmers in Perry and Spencer counties who were attempting to meet a Sept. 16 deadline for certain disaster assistance programs but couldn't due to the impacts of the remnants of Hurricane Ike have until Sept. 29 to file at the Spencer-Perry Farm Service Agency Office near Rockport.

  • Story-time series begins Sept. 30 in TC

    TELL CITY - It's registration time for kids who want to attend Small Talk: Listening With Our Hearts - Signing With Our Hands story time series at the Tell City-Perry County Public Library.

    The series is for children ages 2 to 6 years old and features songs, games, crafts and a video that teaches children how to sign beginning words and phrases.

  • Harvest hopes dashed by wind

    Farmers face steep losses after gusts down corn just ahead of harvest

    TELL CITY - A months-long - and mostly successful - growing season for Perry County corn farmers was blown way, literally, Sept. 14 as powerful winds flattened maturing fields. Damage varied depending on location and maturity level of plants, with the fields closest to harvest sustaining some of the worst damage.

    Many fields were virtually flattened and will be difficult to harvest, although some farmers planned to purchase special attachments that will help pick up some of the downed stalks.