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Local News

  • White-nose syndrome affects Eastern bats

    TELL CITY - White-nose syndrome has killed more than a million bats in states from Vermont to West Virginia and has had mortality rates in excess of 90 percent in some of the caves and mines where bats hibernate during the winter. The most obvious symptom of this problem is the presence of a white fungus around the nose of some affected bats.

    The fungus can also occur on the wings or tail membranes of bats. This is a concern due to population densities of bat species that are found in southern Indiana, particularly the endangered Indiana bat.

    What is WNS?

  • Ivy Tech offers student-aid assistance

    TELL CITY - Need help putting the pieces together on your FAFSA? Ivy Tech Community College is offering assistance with students and parents wanting answers to individual help filling out the FAFSA.

    The service is available for students planning to enroll at any college Tuesday, Feb. 2, and Wednesday, March 3. Sessions are set for 3:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. at Ivy Tech in Tell City.

    Appointments are required. Sign up at the Ivy Tech office or call 547-7915. Students should bring 2009 tax returns, as they will complete FASFAs on computers during the session.

     

  • Voter Registration

    Perry Countians who aren't registered to vote can do so by visiting the county clerk's office, located in the courthouse, or by stopping by the Perry County License Branch.

    April 5 is the deadline for residents to register for the May 4 primary.

  • Board votes to close Tell City Junior High School

    TELL CITY - Seventh- and eighth-graders in the Tell City-Troy Township school district will report to the high school when the next academic year begins.

    School-board members voted Tuesday to close the city's junior-high building at the end of this year, ahead of a decision from the county council about funding for renovations to accommodate the shift. Sixth-graders will remain at William Tell Elementary School.

  • Jury acquits TC woman on battery charge

    TELL CITY - Heather Sandage covered her face in relief Saturday morning after a jury acquitted her of causing the 2005 death of 7-month-old Izaak Harney.

    The jury's verdict, reached in less than two hours, removed the Class A felony that had hung for nearly four years over Sandage, who was the child's baby-sitter.

    As she sat, Sandage's relatives and friends hugged one another and the woman's attorneys, Joseph and Nathan Verkamp.

    On the other side of the courtroom, stunned relatives of the child consoled one another while Harney's parents left the courtroom.

  • Lift-off from St. Croix
  • County's graduation rates improve

    PERRY COUNTY - Perry Central Community School posted a 91.3-percent graduation rate for 2009 to join 100 other schools statewide comprising the top tier for that measure of achievement. Tell City and Cannelton high schools fell into the third tier, representing schools with graduation rates between 70 and 79.9 percent. Tell City's 79.5-percent graduation rate fell just shy of the next category, while Cannelton's posting of 70.8 percent for 2009 was less than a point shy of dropping into the next-lower category. It was, however, a 28.5-percent jump from their 2008 rate.

  • Library officials continue examining circulation systems

    TELL CITY - Members of the Perry County Library board welcomed new member Bill Dickerson at their first monthly meeting of the year Jan. 6.

    Members introduced themselves and board president Mickey Fischer officially welcomed him, encouraging him to feel free to jump into the discussions any time.

    Dickerson, who is a teacher at Perry Central High School, thanked the board members and said he would "listen and learn early." He replaces member Carroll Goffinet.

  • Property-tax bills should be on time in 2010

    PERRY COUNTY - The Indiana Department of Local Government Finance certified Perry County's 2010 budget order and tax rates last week, paving the way for on-time property-tax bills for the first time in at least three years.

    County Auditor Connie Berger said 2010 property-tax bills should be mailed in early spring and will be due May 10. Fall installments will be due in November.

    "Unless legislators change something that impacts tax rates, we'll be back to a normal schedule this year," Berger said last week.

  • Two serve and protect