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Local News

  • Horse-rescue group seeks assistance

    PERRY COUNTY - They do what they do out of their love of horses, but they could use some help.

    Pat Reed and Jo Sodrel launched an effort 15 years ago to start protecting the horses of Perry County. Because the problems of neglect, abuse and lack of education haven't gone away, they've relaunched and expanded their efforts. The problems are bigger than they and the few working with them can handle, however, so they're reaching out for help.

  • Rescue group's needs offer varied giving opportunities

    PERRY COUNTY - Their list of needs is long and varied enough that just about anyone can find something to give to the Perry County chapter of Indiana Horse Rescue.

    Those who can give small cash donations should look for the group's cans at various locations around the county.

    Donations of larger amounts or of hay or other feed, medical supplies, fly spray, halters or "anything to do with horses" would be welcomed, said Pat Reed, one of the group's investigators.

  • Three join elementary faculty at Perry Central

    LEOPOLD - Members of the Perry Central School Board approved the hiring of new elementary teachers and a part-time instructional assistant during an Aug. 10 meeting.

    During a separate meeting Monday, the board heard no comment on the district's proposed 2010 budget and sent it toward a September adoption.

    At the recommendation of elementary principal Ray James, Ashley Meyer and Brandi Springer have joined the elementary school's faculty. Meyer will teach fifth grade while Springer will instruct first-graders.

  • News needs more sponsors to send papers to students

    PERRY COUNTY - Students in all three local school systems have long had chances to learn from The Perry County News, but tough economic times are threatening to cut that opportunity for many.

    The News provides newspapers to area classrooms through the generosity of sponsors, but the number of subscriptions they're providing has dropped dramatically, according to Joyce Dauby, who runs the Newspapers in Education program for The News.

  • Public gets place on board agendas

    TELL CITY - Members of the public will have regular opportunities to address the Tell City-Troy Township School Board at future meetings.

    Member Tom Holm regularly points out that members of the public don't attend their meetings, and did so again at the Aug. 11 regular meeting.

  • German Ridge Trail closed weekdays through Dec. 31

    TELL CITY - Sections of the German Ridge Trail in the Tell City Ranger District of the Hoosier National Forest will be closed weekdays from today through the end of the year.

    According to the U.S. Forest Service, the closure is to ensure the safety of trail users during the German Ridge Restoration Project, which includes a timber sale to remove selected pine trees.  

    The trail closure is from Mondays through Fridays only. The trail will remain open on weekends.

  • Residents can still register for prison-alert system offered by Indiana DOC

    BRANCHVILLE - The Indiana Department of Correction, in partnership with the Indiana Sheriffs' Association, continues to provide an automated system to alert residents living near a state correctional facility of public-safety emergencies.

    The Alert Notification Service keeps residents informed of prison escapes as well as any potential environmental hazards. Alerts were issued in the wake of escapes in March and in 2008 at Branchville Correctional Facility

  • Limb chipping in Troy Monday; council to discuss hydrant fee

    TROY - Limbs will be chipped in Troy Monday and residents will need to have them set out for pickup by 7 a.m. that day.

    For more information call the town office at 547-7501. The town council will meet Sept. 16 and discuss the possibility of passing fire-hydrant charges to residents within city limits.

    The fees, currently paid by the town, are used for fire protection and hydrant maintenance.

    The council will listen to input from residents at the 6 p.m. meeting. The public is invited.

     

  • Security upgrades on fast track

    BRANCHVILLE - Seven new light towers and a 50-strand stun fence are the latest security enhancements at Branchville Correctional Facility. Officials at the low-medium-security prison discussed improvements and offered tours Thursday to local leaders and media.

    The pair of projects carry a price tag of more than $1.1 million and were put on a fast track after the March escape of three offenders who assaulted a maintenance worker and cut through a fence. Two other men scaled a fence in 2008. All five escapees were eventually recaptured.

  • Bullying prevention program under way

    TELL CITY - A lack of bullying in a school "opens so many doors (to students), because they don't have to worry about who's outside waiting for them or who might be waiting at the bus stop," fourth-grade teacher Mark Wahl said in a video recording that will soon be available at the William Tell Elementary School Web site.