.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Market vendor workshop series to continue through spring

    CHRISNEY – If you are a current or potential vendor at farmer’s markets, roadside stands or other retail outlets, make plans to attend Purdue Extension’s upcoming Market Vendor Training Series. This five-part webinar series will cover business planning, food safety and farmers’ market regulations, product display and setup, and marketing. Participants will also have an opportunity to network with other vendors and local resources.

  • Catholic Charities launches Adoption Awareness Campaign

    TELL CITY – November is Adoption Awareness Month and Catholic Charities is launching an awareness campaign to bring awareness to the option of adoption.

    The goal is to educate the community about adoption and the process, to remove negative stigma and myths associated with adoption and bring a more open and positive attitude of understanding to those considering placing their unborn child. The goal is to make adoption a positive option in the community.

  • TC Council reviewing sewage cost-of-service study

    By DON STEEN

    Staff Writer

     

    TELL CITY – The Tell City Common Council had a packed agenda Monday evening, including hearings, resolutions and ordinances on everything from preparing the city’s local match for its Community Crossings Grant to introducing proposed sewer rates. Some of these matters were concluded at the one-hour meeting, but others were merely introduced for further review in future meetings.

  • Republican caucus selects District 74 successor

    By STUART CASSIDY

    Staff Writer

     

    LEOPOLD – It took three rounds of voting for precinct committeemen to make a selection during a caucus Monday at Perry Central School, but once the final ballots were tallied, a Crawford County Councilman, Steve Bartels, stood as the top candidate for the District 74 House seat. In that final round, he bested Mary Roberson by just two votes, 31-29, to earn the party’s choice for the office.

  • Lincoln Trail Bridge work nearly complete

    By VINCE LUECKE

    Editor

     

    In a brief ceremony Wednesday morning, the Indiana Department of Transportation re-dedicated the Bob Cummings Lincoln Trail Bridge, gleaming in the sunlight with a new coat of baby-blue paint. The 51-year-old bridge has received $19 million of work over the past few years and INDOT, which invited Kentucky Transportation Cabinet officials, contractors and local officials, marked the occasion by raising the bridge’s marquee sign in place. It was removed when work began.

  • Event Horizon

    By STUART CASSIDY

    Staff Writer

     

    The Tell City Marching Marksmen’s feature of “Orbis Lunar” has landed them a sixth-place finish in Class D at this past weekend’s Indiana State School Music Association finals. The season’s journey in success has been an out-of-this-world experience for members of a band that is quite quickly growing its reputation as one of the best in the region.

  • Programs, special section to honor veterans

    PERRY COUNTY – As Veterans Day approaches, Perry Countians will honor the lives of the men and women who have served our nation in uniform. Ceremonies are scheduled in all three county school systems and Lincoln Hills Development Corp. will host a breakfast for veterans and guests on Wednesday.

    • Cannelton City Schools will host a program Friday, Nov. 10, at the Cannelton Community Center. Local veterans will be recognized and students have been asked to submit photos of family members who have served in the military.

  • Box of Blessings:

    By VINCE LUECKE

    Editor

     

    TELL CITY – A new Blessing Box created from the time and talents of Perry Countians over the past several months is offering non-perishable food to those in need. 

    According to Louann Oberhausen, a member of St. Paul Catholic Church’s Ministry of Charity, Blessing Boxes like the one located at the church have popped up across the country and allow people to donate non-perishable food items. Those in need can access what they need.

  • A round toward victory
  • The winter forecast?

    By VINCE LUECKE

    Editor

     

    Cold weather is coming, but just how severe will Old Man Winter be in 2017-18? The answer depends on where you put your winter prognostication faith. Local lore is predicting either a bitterly cold winter or a mild season with either lots of snow or very little. The truth is likely somewhere in the middle.

    According to the Old Farmer’s Almanac, winter will be warmer than normal, with slightly above-normal precipitation and below-normal snowfall.