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Today's Features

  • CANNELTON - Myers Grade School student-council members wrote a letter to Branchville Correctional Facility, and it paid off, in the form of a $500 check.

    Along with the beginning of the school year came announcements of funding cuts for education, explained Ron Gibson, assistant superintendent for the prison. "We were worried schools would have to start cutting field trips."

    Such beyond-the-schoolyard experiences are a "huge part of learning," he said.

  • TELL CITY - Plucking snakes of dough from a conveyor line and deftly flipping each into the twist familiar to generations of fans, Brad Smith explains why he and his wife, Sandy, bought the Tell City Pretzel Co. last summer.

    "I grew up with them," the Jasper resident said. "The main reason is they have a good reputation and brand name all over southern Indiana, not just here in Tell City. It just seemed like a nice opportunity."

  • Editor's Note: Tell City Mayor Barbara Ewing submitted this guest column to explain in a first-person question and answer format details about the city's upcoming combined-sewer overflow project. She also addresses upcoming rate increases.

    The city of Tell City is about to embark on the largest single project in its history. This monumental project is called our combined-sewer overflow project, or CSO.

  • MILLSTONE - The Tell City Kiwanis Club and its committee of community members have finalized plans for the memorial services March 13-14 to mark the 50th anniversary of the crash of Northwest Orient Airlines Electra Flight 710 in rural Cannelton March 17, 1960.

  • Sixty-three souls together

    Came to this solemn place,

    And tears came falling down from Heaven

    Like raindrops down a face.

    This and the rest of a poem about the 1960 plane crash near Millstone will be read during a March 13 memorial service commemorating the tragedy.

    Joan Goble's fifth-grade students, who composed it, will also display drawings they created in one of several "learning to give" efforts.

  • Editor's Note: Bob Thomas of Derby submitted this account of his experiences with discrimination and the U.S. military's attempt to safeguard the rights of blacks in the 1950s. He recorded his memories on paper to mark Black History Month, observed each year in February.

    It was January 1954. I had just turned 18 two months before graduating from the B-29 Bomber Maintenance Course at Sheppard Air Force Base in Wichita Falls, Texas. We didn't turn many wrenches in the six-month training course; that would come later during our first and subsequent assignments.