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Acchiardo's on the ballot! So much for the residency challenge . . .

16 replies [Last post]
kroessman
User offline. Last seen 3 years 40 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 08/30/2010

The State's election board ruled unanimously (4-0) today that Rod Acchiardo is not in violation of any election laws regarding residency. So now we're set for a race between him and Collins for the prosecutor job in November! Finally Perry County gets a choice. If anyone would like more information about Acchiardo, he does have a website:  http://www.acchiardo.com :) Now that he's cleared to run, maybe now we can all focus on the issues at hand.

CLETUSE
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Joined: 01/03/2012
Rod Acchiardo

Is this still a "hot topic!" Is this item going to appear in the paper perpetually?

mkp
User offline. Last seen 3 years 46 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 09/29/2010
Acchiardo

His clients can't even get him to return a phone call or answer a question. Is that what we want in a prosecutor? Find somebody who has hired him and see what they say before you vote for him.

James Callender
User offline. Last seen 3 years 39 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 08/30/2010
I've heard this complaint

I've heard this complaint many times from his clients.

I'd also ask everyone to notice all the Acchiardo signs around Tell City. The Ramsey Cartel has put up signs on every property they own.

I ask again, are the people of Perry County willing to give more power to a group that already has so much? What agenda do they have for this office?

kroessman
User offline. Last seen 3 years 40 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 08/30/2010
Yes, judges do rule on

Yes, judges do rule on sentencing. Police make arrests and do investigations. They turn the evidence over to the prosecutor, who decides what charges stick and then puts on a prosecution. The judge then rules based on the law as it relates to the crimes for which the defendant was charged and convicted. If a prosecutor, attorney and client come into a plea agreement, a judge rules on whether the plea agreement is legal. Every area of the judicial system works together. I have knowledge of the system, you chose to oversimplify my argument to fit your concept that Republicans are now being soft on crime.

under_estimated
User offline. Last seen 3 years 49 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 09/02/2010
Ready for the upcoming change!!

It is time for REAL change in Perry County. I personally met Mr. Acchiardo tonight and I have to say I am very impressed. He has wonderful ideas that will lead Perry County's justice system in the right direction. I know FAR too many people that have been "let off the hook" by our current prosecuter Bob Collins. I am a law abiding citizen and I expect my tax dollars to provide somewhere safe for my family to live. Putting criminals back on the street and "letting" friends-of-friends off scott-free from charges is NOT ACCEPTABLE. I personally know a few cases of this and am sickened by the thought of it. Bob Collins is on his way OUT!!!!!!!!

SarahM
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Joined: 09/03/2010
I have known Mr. Collins as

I have known Mr. Collins as Perry County Prosecutor for many years and one thing I know for a fact is that he doesn't let friends of friends off 'scott free'. He treats everyone equally and will get a special prosecutor when warranted. In fact, some of his friends have been disgrunted because he hasn't given them 'special treatment'. How about we stick to the truth and not make up stuff to win political points?

under_estimated
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Joined: 09/02/2010
WRONG AGAIN!

Sarah, I do believe you are wrong! I guess some of these cases need to be discussed publicly so EVERYONE will have a chance at finding out the TRUTH. I know of 4 cases that mysteriously "VANISHED" into thin air because of of certain "affiliations" with the prosecuter. 2 of the cases should have cost him his job a LONG time ago. I have been told that certain people in his office are closely being "monitored" for a lack of better words,during his campaign and are told to stay quiet. I would hate to be scared to go to my job.

SarahM
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Joined: 09/03/2010
Silly Season!!

LOL!!!

James Callender
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Joined: 08/30/2010
Pay attention to the fine

Pay attention to the fine print of the Acchiardo campaign. He's campaigning on letting more people go, not less. I've met Acchiardo as well. I can't say I agree with his proposals or his choices so far. His promises of selective prosecution concern me greatly.

James Callender
User offline. Last seen 3 years 39 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 08/30/2010
Acchiardo’s residency problem

Acchiardo’s residency problem is just the first of many personal hurdles he will have to overcome to be elected. Many questions remain about his personal history and why he chose to run for this office. My greatest concern is what seems to be the central theme of the Acchiardo campaign; that Collins has convicted too many people.
Correct me if I’m wrong, but isn’t the job of the Prosecuting Attorney to prosecute people? Acchiardo seems to believe that if you convict too many criminals, you should be thrown out of office. This is troubling on many levels. The most troubling to me personally is the fact that it is much easier to be soft on criminals, and let them roam freely through the community, when you don’t live in that community. Acchiardo may have become technically compliant with the residency laws, but this still doesn’t mean he is invested in our community.
I think it is highly likely that his interest in this office is more about increasing the power held by his family, who already hold a significant amount of power, rather than prosecuting those who violate our laws. The question I present to the voters of Perry County is “Are you comfortable with consolidating so much power in the hands of so few?”

kroessman
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Joined: 08/30/2010
And a question needing clarified . . .

One more question for Mr. Callender . . . you first say that, and I'll quote: "Acchiardo may have become technically compliant with the residency laws, but this still doesn't mean he is invested in our community." But you then go on to argue that it's "highly likely that his interest in this office is more about increasing the power held by his family, who already hold a significant amount of power ..."

So which is it, sir? I'm not wanting to split hairs, but it seems you're trying to say two different, conflicting things. If Rod isn't invested in this community, how can you bring his family into things to argue he's got too MUCH power? If he already had all this power in the community, he'd already be fairly seriously invested in the community. Regardless, having had more than eight years practicing law in Perry County, representing thousands of people in the area, it's hard to argue he's not invested in this community.

kroessman
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Joined: 08/30/2010
Replying to Mr. Callender

It's not that Acchiardo thinks merely that Collins has convicted too many people. It's that he feels there's been little discretion used when handling the cases of first-time offenders. Too many Perry County citizens are being charged with felonies without properly considering diversion opportunities / drug court, etc. that could help a first-time offender become a last-time offender. If you convict someone of a felony for, say, stealing thirty dollars of merchandise at Wal-Mart when they've never committed a crime before, that person can never work at places like Waupaca or even a fast-food place like Wendy's, because they cannot pass a background check. If a person goes through a diversion program, or in the case of drug abuse, the drug court, and then they commit another crime, they should be punished to the full extent of our felony laws, but shouldn't we use all the resources at our disposal before we label someone a felon?

James Callender
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Joined: 08/30/2010
If Acchiardo and his

If Acchiardo and his followers don’t like the way the laws are written, then maybe he should be running for state legislature. A prosecutor’s job is to prosecute those who are accused of breaking the law. What you are saying in your argument is that even if someone breaks the law, maybe we shouldn’t prosecute them, just ask them not to do it again? That’s a little bizarre don’t you think, asking for votes with a campaign promise of not doing the job?
What happens when a meth manufacturer comes before Acchiardo the Prosecutor? Is Acchiardo going to say “Well, as long as you promise not to do it again, you can go home”? That’s the logic you’re using.
Your argument further reinforces my hypothesis that Mr. Acchiardo’s interest in the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office is more about acquisition of power than protecting the community. With promises of selective prosecution, it is worse than I originally thought.

kroessman
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Discretion

It's a matter of discretion. If you have a first-time offender and there's the option for a misdemeanor charge to stick, that could involve jail time and rehabilitation without labeling a person as a felon for life. It's not always a matter of "either the person's given the maximum sentence or there's no sentence at all." A person could serve jail time for a misdemeanor and still be employable when they get out. Unless you're wanting all prisoners to go to jail for life, eventually they get out. I, for one, would prefer that the ones who do can still work for a living and become productive members of society after they've been through the system.

James Callender
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Judges hand down sentences,

Judges hand down sentences, prosecutors do not. Not to be a horse's rear, but a little knowledge of the justice system might come in handy.

I never thought I'd hear a Republican say we should be soft on crime. That party has really taken a turn toward the bizarre.

SarahM
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Joined: 09/03/2010
A farce is a farce is a

A farce is a farce is a farce. Acchairdo still lives in his $400,000 house in Newburgh, not at 306 Ridgeview Drive, Tell City. I invite anyone to check it out. Perry Countians aren't that dumb!